BHS logo

Academic Planning Guide
2017-2018



Beaverton High School

Building a community that fosters the power to think, the courage to act and the strength to persevere.

sketch of BHS
13000 SW 2nd Street
Beaverton, OR 97005
Phone: 503-356-2830 Fax: 503-356-2825
Web: www.beaverton.k12.or.us/schools/beaverton
Facebook and Twitter: BeavertonHigh

Anne ErwinPrincipal
Melissa BaranAssistant Principal
Alyson DubuqueAssistant Principal
Andy RobinsonAssistant Principal
Mike BlokAthletic Director
Jason SarmientoActivities Director
Dr. Carl MeadTitle II Officer(503) 591-4311
Mike ChamberlainTitle IX Officer(503) 591-4429
Constance BullDistrict 504 Manager(503) 591-4380

For prompt and equitable resolution of student and employee complaints alleging discrimination based on sex or disability, please refer to Administrative Regulation AC. For information on harassment complaint procedures, refer to Administrative Regulations GBN/JBA, GBNA or JFCF.

EQUAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY

The Beaverton School District recognizes the diversity and worth of all individuals and groups. It is the policy of the Beaverton School District that there will be no discrimination or harassment of individuals or groups based on race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, marital status, age, veterans' status, genetic information or disability in any educational programs, activities or employment. The school district staff is engaged in a continuous effort to provide equal education opportunities for students and to eliminate those conditions which may cause discrimination. BEAVERTON SCHOOL DISTRICT/BOARD POLICY #GBA

Academic Definitions

Graduation Requirements
24 total credits, including requirements in Applied Arts, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, Math, Health and P.E.

Additional Course Work/Credit Recovery
Credits for making up courses failed may be earned through Evening Academy, summer sessions, an accredited correspondence school, college/university, or community college. See your counselor to discuss these and additional options.

Advanced Placement Scholar

Athletic/Activity Eligibility
Students must meet the Beaverton School District and OSAA eligibility standards if they wish to participate in athletics, extra-curricular and co-curricular activities. All ninth graders are eligible to participate during the first six weeks of school if they are taking five or more classes. After the first six weeks of school, there will be additional standards for 9-12 grade students. Students must be enrolled in a minimum of five classes for eligibility.

AVID
The AVID philosophy is to hold students accountable to the highest standard, provide them with academic and social support to they can rise to the challenge. See the AVID section of this guide for more information.

Beaverton High Scholar
Graduating students must meet all of the following criteria to be considered a Beaverton High Scholar:

Class Standing
The total number of credits earned determines a student's class standing. The minimum credits required for Grade 10 (Sophomore) class standing is 5.0, Grade 11 (Junior) 11.0, Grade 12 (Senior) 17.0.

Credits
Credits are the units by which academic progress is measured. Students earn 0.5 credit by passing one (1) semester class. Students have the potential to earn 7 credits per year. Students need to earn 24 credits to graduate.

Dual Language Program
Formally known as the Two-Way Immersion program, the mission of Beaverton High School’s Dual-Language program is to honor and develop multilingual, multiliterate and multicultural students through rigorous, culturally inclusive education. All Dual Language courses have the same learning targets and credits as their respective English courses, but these courses are taught almost entirely in Spanish.

Essential Skills
The State of Oregon requires that students demonstrate that they are proficient in certain “essential skills” – skills that are deemed critical for future success – before they are awarded a diploma. Essential Skills are process skills that can be applied in a variety of courses, subjects, experiences and settings. Current state tests and local assessments will provide most students the opportunity to show they have mastered the requirements. Additional evidence options are considered as well.

Grade Point Average
Grade point averages are computed on a 4-point scale with the following point values awarded per grade: A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D =1, and F = 0. Weighted points are offered for Advanced Placement (AP) and Dual Credit courses. For example, an “A” in a weighted class will yield 5 points (4 points for the “A” and 1 more point as a weighted “bonus”), a B = 4, C = 3. Both regular and weighted GPA will appear on a student's academic transcript.

Graduation with Honors
Seniors with an unweighted 3.5 or higher GPA will be recognized as honor graduates.

Independent Study
Independent study credit is available to students on an individual basis. It is not offered for courses taught during the regular school day. Students interested in petitioning for credit must complete an independent study application and have it approved by the cooperating teacher, counselor and school principal.

Pathway
Area of focused study with specific coursework requirements. At BHS, the Health Careers and Marketing departments offer Pathway programs.. An Engineering Pathway is under development. Choose Pathway Programs in the menu for more information and all pathway requirements.

Prerequisite
A course which is required or recommended and must be passed (sometimes with a specific grade) before taking a course. Students who do not meet the prerequisites must have instructor approval to enroll.

Salutatorian Requirements
The salutatorian will be the graduating senior with the second highest cumulative weighted GPA, earn credit in at least 6 classes each semester their senior year, and qualify as a Beaverton High Scholar.

Schedule Change Requests / Withdrawal from Courses
In the event that a student is placed incorrectly, has an incomplete schedule, or an error in their schedule, he/she may request a schedule change. The last day to request a schedule change will be five days after the semester begins. If a student withdraws from a class after the last day to request a schedule change, he/she will receive a failing grade for the class. The only exception is teacher- approved level changes, which can be made throughout the semester without penalty.

Semester Calendar
Beaverton High School is on a semester schedule. Students attend seven classes plus Beaver Lodge for each of two (2) terms for a total sixteen (16) semester classes per year.

Student Placement
Student placement is based on grade level graduation requirements, teacher recommendation, present classroom work, past performance, test scores, and other criteria related to the student's ability, potential, and career goals. Make certain you check the forecasting sheet closely for courses that need a teacher's approval prior to enrollment.

Valedictorian Requirements
The valedictorian will be the graduating senior with the highest cumulative weighted GPA, earn credit in at least 6 classes each semester their senior year, and qualify as a Beaverton High Scholar.

Counseling

The BHS Counseling department is the destination for new student enrollment, registration and scheduling. Beyond these fundamental responsibilities, our counselors offer many other services to students, including:

Annual BHS Counseling Calendar

August
New student orientations
Scheduling and credit review

September
Registration
Schedule review and changes
Senior credit checks
Back-to-School Night
Senior College Night
Freshman Orientation Groups
Post HS conferences for seniors
Financial Aid Night

October
Latino College Night
Conferences with credit deficient students
PSAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test
College representative visitations
College National Merit Applications processed
FAFSA Completion Workshops
Students file Financial Aid Form (FAFSA)

November
How to Find Affordable Colleges Night
Scholarship Information Night
College applications processed
College representative visitations
Nine weeks grade report
National College Fair
Senior Advisory lesson: Scholarship Financial Aid

December

January 1st college applications due to counselor by December 1st

January
College applications processed
Second Semester schedule reviews
Final Exams-Semester grade report

February
Senior credit checks
Incoming Freshman Family Night
9th-11th grade College Night
New student registration
Semester schedule changes
Senior graduation checks
College applications processed

March
Forecasting
Progress reports
OUS Visitation Day
Scholarship applications processed

April
Scholarship applications processed
Junior post-high school planning conferences
Nine weeks grade report
ACT Assessment Testing Day

May
Advanced Placement exams
Credit-deficient students monitored
Scholarship awards assembly

June
Graduation for seniors
Notification of non-grads
Final exams-Semester grade report

Beaverton School District College Information Nights
Each year, district counselors plan a series of district-wide college information nights, all starting at 7 PM and held at various high schools. Check the website at your school for these information nights during the 2017-2018 academic year. Topics covered at these college information nights include:

Beaverton High School College Information Nights
Beaverton High School Counselors have planned the following college information nights specific to Beaverton families:

2017-2018 SAT/ACT/PSAT Testing Dates (anticipated)

    P S A T

    S A T

    A C T

Oregon University System (OUS) Admissions Requirements, 2017-18

Here are the basic admission requirements for all Oregon public universities. Students must also fulfill the Campus Admission Requirements for each university they are interested in (see overview chart below or visit a campus website)

The general admission requirement include the following:

GED or Non-Standard High Schools
If you earned a General Education Development certificate (GED) or graduated from a non-standard or unaccredited high school or homeschool program, ask a counselor about OUS admission requirements.

Honors Colleges and Programs
Several of Oregon's public universities offer selective honors colleges and programs to Oregon students. Opportunities may include working closely with scholars, completing an undergraduate thesis, and learning within a community of highly motivated students. These programs sometimes have special admissions requirements and deadlines; find out more on campus websites.

Housing
Three OUS institutions, OIT, PSU, and UO—do not require freshmen to live on campus. EOU, OSU, SOU and WOU require freshmen to live in campus-approved housing. Many freshmen choose a group living situation such as a residence hall because it offers such advantages as convenient location, reasonable cost, prepared meals, and the opportunity to interact with other students in a learning and living environment. For campus housing applications and further information, visit unversity websites.

Minimum Undergraduate Freshman Admission Requirements, 2017-18


EOU OIT OSU* PSU SOU UO WOU
High School Graduation High School Graduation Required
Subject Requirements 15 Units Required (4-English, 3-Math, 3-Science, 3-Social Studies, 2-Second Language.) Course grades must be C- or above to count as a unit.
SAT / ACT Scores1 No minimum score, but test results are required. They may be used for additional review, or to determine scholarship eligibility.
High School GPA 2.75 3.00 3.002 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.75
Additional Campus Review Required3 If below 2.75; or fewer than 15 subject units If 2.50 to 2.99 Applications are reviewed through a comprehensive review process. If below 3.00; or fewer than 15 subject units If below 3.00 Applications reviewed through a comprehensive review process. (Average GPA of admitted students 3.6) If below 2.75; or fewer than 15 subject units

1Minimum test scores are not set for regular campus admissions, but test results may be used during additional campus review processes. OUS schools may require a standardized writing exam. Students submitting the SAT II Reasoning exam will be submitting a standardized writing exam. Students submitting the ACT should submit scores from the optional writing examination.

2OSU requires the Insight Resume

3All OUS institutions conduct more comprehensive reviews of applicants who do not meet the minimum required GPA for admission. Reviews include additional factors such as standardized test results, rigor of courses taken, review of writing sample or personal essays, non-cognitive factors, and other indicators that predict potential success in college. Academic performance and meeting minimum qualifications are not the sole criteria for admission to an OUS university. A university may evaluate other factors to determine ability to maintain the standards of academic and professional conduct expected at the university.

NCAA Athletic and Scholarship Eligibility
As a prospective student-athlete at a Division I or II institution, students have certain responsibilities to attend to before they may participate. Information concerning who needs to register with the NCAA clearinghouse and what documents should be submitted can be found in “The Guide for College-Bound Student Athletes” at www.ncaaclearinghouse.org.

NCAA Division I

To play sports at a Division I school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

  1. Complete 16 NCAA core courses:
    • 4 years of English
    • 3 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)
    • 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science)
    • 2 years of social sciences
    • 1 additional year of English, math, or natural/physical science
    • 4 additional years of English, math, or natural/physical science, social science,foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.
  2. Complete 10 NCAA core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before your seventh semester.
  3. Earn at least a 2.3 GPA in your NCAA core courses.
  4. Earn an ACT sum score or SAT combined score that matches your core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale.

NCAA Division II

To play sports at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements
Before August 1, 2018

  1. Complete 16 NCAA core courses
  2. Earn at least a 2.0 GPA in your NCAA core courses.
  3. Earn an ACT sum score of 68 or an SAT combined score of 820.

After August 1, 2018

  1. Complete 16 NCAA core courses.
  2. Earn at least a 2.2 GPA in your NCAA core courses.
  3. Earn an ACT sum score or SAT combined score that matches your core-course GPA on the Division II sliding scale.

Core Courses for Division II

To play sports at a Division II school, you must complete these NCAA core courses:

Information on NCAA Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse Approved courses can be found at www.ncaaclearinghouse.org. Not all courses offered at Beaverton High School are approved for NCAA initial eligibility. Contact your school counselor, coach or athletic director for complete and current information.

NCAA Division III

Division III schools provide an integrated environment focusing on academic success while offering a competitive athletics environment. While Division III schools do not offer athletics scholarships, 75 percent of Division III student-athletes receive some form of merit- or need-based financial aid. If you are planning to attend a Division III school, you do not need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center. Division III schools set their own admission standards.

NAIA Athletic and Scholarship Eligibility
As a prospective student-athlete at an NAIA institution, students have certain responsibilities to attend to before they may participate. Information concerning who needs to register with the NAIA Eligibility Center and what documents should be submitted can be found in “The NAIA Guide for College-Bound Student Athletes” at www.playNAIA.org.

If you graduate from an accredited high school, to participate at the NAIA level you must meet two of the three following requirements:

  1. Test score requirement: Achieve a minimum of 18 on the ACT or 860 on the SAT.
  2. GPA requirement: Achieve a minimum 2.0 GPA.
  3. Class Rank requirement: Graduate in the top half of your high school class.

 

BSD Diploma Requirements
Subject Credits
English/Language Arts 4
Mathematics - Algebra I level or above 3
Science 3
Social Studies 3
Physical Education I / Physical Education II 0.5 / 0.5
Health 1
Second Language, The Arts, Career & Technical Education 3
Electives 5.5
Career Development 0.5
TOTAL CREDITS 24
Essential Skills
Read & Comprehend a Variety of Text Smarter Balanced / OAKS / PLAN or ACT / Work Samples / Local Assessment Option / Compass / WorkKeys
Write Clearly & Accurately Smarter Balanced / OAKS / ACT / Work Samples / Local Assessment Option
Apply Mathematics in a Variety of Settings Smarter Balanced / OAKS / PLAN or ACT / Work Samples / Local Assessment Option / Compass / WorkKeys
Personalized Learning
Educational Plan & Profile Develop an educational plan and build an educational profile to guide learning toward student's personal, career and post-high school goals.
Career-Related Learning Experiences Participate in experiences that connect classroom learning with real life experiences in the workplace, community, and/or school relevant to student's education plan
Extended Application Apply and extend knowledge and skills in new and complex situations related to the student's personal and career interests and post-high school goals

Please contact your High School's Counseling Office for additional details.

Graduation and Essential Skills
To obtain an Oregon diploma, all students must demonstrate proficiency in the Essential Skills of reading, writing and applying mathematics. There are several options available for students to demonstrate their proficiency.

The following are test options approved by the Oregon State Board of Education for Reading and Math.

   read-write-options

AP exam scores of three or higher on mathematics exams, the English Literature exam, and various social studies exams can serve as evidence of proficiency in Math or Reading.

The following are test options approved by the Oregon State Board of Education for Writing.

*a composite score of 40 (with an average score of four on each required trait)

**These achievement standards are based on the composite score derived from both the selected response and direct-writing portions of the test. The SAT refers to this as the Writing section of the SAT. The ACT refers to this as the combined English/Writing test.

Work Sample Options for Essential Skills
Students may meet essential skill requirements using work samples scored with the official state scoring guides.

Reading
Students must produce two reading work samples, at least one of which must be informative. Each work sample must have a total score of twelve or higher, with no trait lower than three. Traits are Demonstrate General Understanding, Develop an Interpretation, and Analyze Text.

Writing
Students must complete two writing work samples, at least one of which must be expository or persuasive, the other may be in any of the approved modes (expository, persuasive, narrative). Scores on each work sample must be four or higher in the required traits of Ideas/Content, Organization, Sentence Fluency and Conventions

Applying Mathematics
Students must complete two mathematics problem solving tasks, one each for any two of the required content strands--Algebra, Geometry, or Statistics. Each work sample must score four or higher in all five Process Dimensions. The five Process Dimensions are Making Sense of the Task, Representing and Solving the Task, Communicating Reasoning, Accuracy and Reflecting and Evaluating.

Four Year Planning
Each year counselors work with students to develop their 4-year plan. This plan ensures students take appropriate required and elective courses depending on their career pathway and post-high school plans. Parents are also encouraged to review their child's 4-year plan annually. See Four Year Plan to create your own plan.

Student Education Plan & Profile

Graduation requirements
0.5 credit of career education is required for graduation. This credit is earned during the four years of StEPP activities.

Beaverton High School strives to empower all students to be prepared for, excited about and confident in their future. In preparation for their future, the state of Oregon requires all students to complete 0.5 credit of career education in order to graduate. At Beaverton High School, rather than taking a semester Career Education class, the Career Education credit happens in the community, in classes, and in Beaver Lodge. For example, our freshmen and sophomores participate in Future Days, visiting college campuses and industry sites; juniors complete mock interviews, while our seniors complete a culminating Senior Project. All students utilize the Oregon Career Information System (CIS) to complete interest inventories and skills assessments, research various careers and colleges, complete scholarship searches, and document their personal learning activities in their electronic portfolio.

9th Grade: 0.125 Credits

10th Grade: 0.125 Credits

11th Grade: 0.125 Credits

12th Grade: 0.125 Credits

Please note: CRLE forms are available on the CIS website and must be submitted electronically through the student’s CIS account. Please contact Karen Stabeno, Director of College and Career Readiness at Karen_stabeno@beaverton.k12.or.us if you have questions.

Senior Project
The required Senior Project offers students an opportunity to reflect on their experiences, learning, and growth during high school and their preparation for the future. Successful completion of the Senior Project is required to earn the 0.5 Career Education credit, a graduation requirement.

Senior Project Requirements:

  1. Résumé
  2. Product
  3. Reflection Essay
  4. Project Cover Letter
  5. Presentation
  1. Résumé
    A résumé is an essential tool of any graduate. For most BHS seniors, please just update the resume you created your junior year for the mock interviews. Samples are on the BHS website.
  2. Product
    This component of the Senior Project is the student's opportunity to choose the product that best demonstrates who they are, including their skills, knowledge, interests, and abilities.
    Examples of Products
    • a written essay (see optional essay prompts)
    • a portfolio of experiences
    • a video that captures an experience, talent, or accomplishment
    • an awareness campaign on a topic of your choosing
    • create something related to your future (like a comic book, children's book, charity run or a new recipe for professional chefs)
    • development of an app or website
    • an experiment and results
    • a project that you already completed/constructed (like an engine repaired by AutoTech students, or a BHS Pathway project, or the School-Based Health Center committees' work.)
  3. Reflection Essay (2 typed pages)
    A personal reflection of how far you've come, how much you learned, what you learned from the senior project, and how well you are prepared for your future.
  4. Project Cover Letter (1 typed page)
    The Senior Project cover letter serves as an introduction to your senior project. Your cover letters should include a general overview of your knowledge and skills, why you are prepared to graduate, and your future plans. Use specific examples of your abilities. This should be a typed one-page letter. The letter should explain the connection between your experiences, Reflection Essay and Product.
  5. Presentation
    Senior Projects will be displayed and presented on May 19th/20th. All seniors will present an oral exposition in an exhibition style (like a Science fair), to a rotating audience of community members, family members, and BHS students.

Beaverton High School offers many opportunities for students to pursue a challenging academic program. College credit is available in many circumstances.

Advanced Programs

Advanced Placement AP logo®
The Advanced Placement or AP program at Beaverton offers twenty-two college-level courses that are challenging and stimulating. These allow for individual academic progress and accomplishment, and explore subjects in greater depth. Exams held in the spring give students the opportunity to gain advanced placement and/or college credit at a substantial savings over regular college tuition. Please refer to individual colleges for their AP policies. To forecast for an AP course at Beaverton please refer to the course descriptions in this guide. AP exams cost $89.00 each; exam registration is in March of the exam year. Fee waivers are available for students on free/reduced lunch.

The AP Program at Beaverton High School is committed to providing exam fee assistance to all students in need.

PCC Dual Credit PCC logo
PCC Dual Credit courses offer students the opportunity to start their college education while in high school. PCC credits are transferable to all public universities within the Oregon University system and many other institutions outside the state. The cost to students is free. Find more information at http://www.pcc.edu/prepare/head-start/dual-credit/

Portland State University
Portland State University's PSU Challenge Program and EXCEL: School of Business Dual Degree Program concurrent credit courses provides qualified students the opportunity to enroll in PSU courses for credit. Courses are taught in BHS classrooms during the regular school day by BHS teachers who have met the criteria to be hired as college instructors at PSU. Students pay a program fee, which constitutes approximately a 60% savings over the price regular college tuition. All Oregon University system schools accept the PSU Challenge and Excel credit, as do most private universities. BHS offers Writing 121 and English Literature Survey as PSU Challenge courses and Business & Marketing Communications as Excel courses. Beaverton High School is committed to providing exam fee assistance to all students in need.

BHS Pathway Programs
Pathway programs in Health Careers and Marketing offer students the chance to focus their program of study and demonstrate their accomplishment by earning Pathway distinction at graduation. Learn about the specific pathway requirements for each.

BHS Honors Designation
Honors designation offers 9th and 10th graders the opportunity to prepare for the challenge of advanced programs. The Language Arts and Social Studies departments offer honors opportunities to all students. In the fall, students in Lit and Comp 9 & 10 and Social Studies 9 &10 can register for the Honors option.

Special Note
Students should take the most challenging courses for which they are qualified–within reason. All Beaverton classes are challenging, especially when taken in combination with AP or dual credit classes. The challenge is finding the right balance. You may need to be challenged to push yourself harder by seeking tougher classes. On the other hand, you may have a tendency to over-extend yourself. For all but the most organized and committed students, it is not recommended to take more than three AP, PSU Challenge or dual credit classes in addition to participating in extra- curricular activities, community service and/or working. We encourage all students to talk with their parents, teachers, and counselors regarding the courses they take next year.

Advanced Placement

Why Participate in AP?
With twenty-two courses and exams, Beaverton's AP program offers something for everyone. The only requirements are a strong curiosity about the subject you plan to study and the willingness to work hard. Here are just a few reasons to sign up:

Gain the Edge in College Preparation

Stand Out in the College Admissions Process

Broaden Your Intellectual Horizons

How Do I Enroll?
Talk to an AP teacher or to your counselor about the course you want to take. Discuss the course workload and any preparation you might need. Beaverton High School offers AP courses and exams in the following:

BHS Advanced Placement (AP) Courses
English Math Social Studies Science World Language Art
AP English Literature AP Calculus AB AP Psychology AP Biology AP Spanish AP Studio Art
AP English Language AP Calculus BC AP Human Geography AP Chemistry AP French AP Music Theory
AP Statistics AP Microeconomics AP Environment Science AP Japanese
AP Macroeconomics AP Physics 1
AP US Gov't AP Physics 2
AP US History
AP Comparative Gov't
AP Courses run for the full year; in Spring, students can pay a fee to take AP exams from the College Board to receive the AP credit.

Course descriptions are found in the individual department course listings. Students may choose to take as many AP courses as they desire as long as they meet the prerequisites. Qualified students may arrange independent study in subjects not offered at BHS with the permission of interested staff.

AP Exams and College Credit
The tests are designed to assess the extent to which high school students have learned the skills and concepts taught in college courses in these subject areas. Colleges and universities notify students of the advanced placement or degree credit they have been granted. Scores are mailed directly to students. Registration is in March and the exams take place in May. There is a fee of $59 per exam. Exam fee waivers are available for students who qualify for free or reduced lunch or those with financial need. AP Exams are scored on a range of 1-5. Scores of 4 or 5, respectively, mean the student is well qualified or extremely well qualified in the subject area; these scores are comparable to a college grade of A. A score of 3 means the student is qualified and is comparable to a B; a score of 2, possibly qualified and comparable to a C; and a score of 1 indicates no recommendation. Students who score at least a 3 may receive one or more of the following benefits:

NOTE: Not all colleges accept AP credit. Check with the institution(s) of choice before signing up for the exam(s).

College Dual Credit Courses PCC logo | PSU logo | OIT logo | CCC logo
The following BHS courses offer college credit usually FREE. This is a simple and easy way to obtain college credits, as the BHS courses are aligned with real college courses. The high school and college course titles, codes, credits and awarding college are included in the table below.

BHS Dual Credit Courses
BHS Course College Course Title College Course Credits College
Computer Applications Basic Computer Skills/MS Office CAS 133 3 PCC
Computer Graphics 1 Beginning Photoshop CAS 118 3 PCC
Computer Graphics 2 Desktop Publishing: InDesign CAS 232 3 PCC
Marketing 1 Innovation & New Products MSD123A 1 PCC
Marketing 2 Organizations & People MSD 107 3 PCC
Sports & Event Marketing Goal Setting and Productivity MSD 180A 1 PCC
Sports & Event Marketing Project Management - Intro MSD 279 4 PCC
Sports & Event Marketing Project Management - MS Project CAS 220 3 PCC
Marketing Management Principles of Management & Supervision MSD 101 3 PCC
Marketing Management Workplace Communication Skills MSD 105 3 PCC
Marketing Seminar Leadership Skill Development MSD 121 3 PCC
Marketing Seminar Job Search Strategies MSD 123 1 PCC
Marketing Seminar Time Management MSD 174 1 PCC
Marketing Seminar Effective Presentation Skills MSD 194 1 PCC
Marketing Seminar Introduction to Buisness BA 101 4 PCC
Digital Marketing Basic Internet Skills CAS 104 1 PCC
Digital Marketing Introduction to Windows CAS 103 1 PCC
Digital Marketing Team Building MSD 177 1 PCC
Personal Finance Personal Finance Fin 218 4 PSU
Business Mktg/Comm Business Communications Using Technology BA 205 4 PSU
Writing 121 College Writing Wr 121 4 PSU
Survey of English Literature Survey of English Literature ENG 204 4 PSU
STEM Physics Exploring Engineering ENGR 100 1 PCC
Drafting & Design 2 Intro to Google Sketch-Up ARCH 127 3 PCC
Drafting & Design 2 Introduction to AutoCAD CADD 126 3 PCC
Drafting & Design 1 Drafting Fundamentals CADD 160 4 PCC
Web Design Introduction to X/HTML CAS 106 1 PCC
Web Design Beginning Website Creation: Dreamweaver CAS 111D 3 PCC
Pre-Calculus College Algebra MTH 111 5 PCC
Pre-Calculus Elementary Functions MTH 112 5 PCC
FST Intermediate Algebra MTH 95 4 PCC
Health Careers 1 First Aid Basics & Beyond HE 252 4 PCC
Health Careers 1 Intro to Today's Careers in Healthcare CG130H 2 PCC
Advanced Health Careers Medical Terminology MP111 4 PCC
Human Anatomy/Physiology Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology BI 121 4 PCC
Human Anatomy/Physiology Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology II BI 122 4 PCC
Human Anatomy/Physiology Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology (optional) BIO 103 4 OIT
Nursing Assistant 1 Nurse Assisting 1 NUR 100, NUR 100C 7 CCC
TOTAL 114
How do I receive dual credit?
BHS Teachers will advise students and parents on steps to receive the dual credit.
For PCC Dual Credit, familes are encouraged to review the syllabus in order to make a decision regarding applying for dual credit.
Teachers will walk students through the step-by-step process to apply to PCC and register for the dual credit typically half way through the semester.

BHS Pathway Information

Engineering & Trades
Beaverton High School is currently developing an Engineering Career Pathway. The Engineering 1 and Engineering 2 courses meet the first 2 years requirement, and the Drafting & Design and Programming courses each meet elective requirements, for the developing Engineering pathway. Further requirements and opportunities for this pathway will be presented in 2017-2018 and beyond.

Health Careers
This pathway is designed for students with an interest in exploring or pursuing a career in health services. Students learn core knowledge and skills common to major health careers. Students will develop a realistic view and understanding of the preparation needed, educational pathways and day in the life of a health care professional. This pathway would be appropriate for students looking at careers in nursing, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, emergency medicine, physical and occupational therapy, speech and rehabilitation, fitness, sports medicine and medical social services.

Marketing
This pathway is designed to prepare students for employment and/or continuing education opportunities in business and marketing through:

Each course in this pathway prepares students to advance toward higher education as well as acquire immediate job skills. Students learn how to become productive employees and gain the academic skills to increase their earning potential while still in high school.

Health Careers Pathway 8.0 total credits required

Lower Level Core (4.0 credits required)

Upper Level Core (4.0 credits required)

All performance standards must be met to move to Advanced Health Careers

Highly Recommended Courses

Recommended Courses

*Lower Level Core Courses are Performance Indicators
*Upper Level Core Courses satisfy requirements for CLRS and CLRE

Marketing Pathway 5.0 total credits required

All Marketing Pathway courses are PCC dualcredit courses with an opportunity for EXCEL: School of Business Dual Degree Program (more details here: https://www.pdx.edu/sba/excel).

Marketing Core Courses (3.0 required)

Marketing Elective Courses (1.0 required)

Marketing Capstone Course (required)*

Recomended Course Sequence

9th grade
 Computer Apps

10th grade
 Marketing 1

11th grade
 Marketing 2
 Marketing elective

12th grade
 Marketing Seminar
 Marketing elective

Four Year Plan

Students need to earn a minimum of 24 credits to graduate. Students should follow an ambitious course of study in high school in preparation to meet the challenges of post-high school education.

Area Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior
Language Arts
4.0 credits
Lit and Comp 9
(Honors recommended for students interested in challenging themselves)
Lit and Comp 10 (Honors recommended for students interested in challenging themselves) American Lit
AP English Language
Full year of Lit.
Mathmatics
3.0 credits
Alg/Geo/Stats 1
Geometry
Alg/Geo/Stats 1
Geometry
Geo Survey
Algebra 2
Adv. Algebra 2
Algebra 2
Geometry
Adv. Algebra 2
AP Stats
FST
Pre-Calculus
Adv. Algebra 2
FST
Pre-Calculus
AP Stats
AP Calc AB
AP Calc BC
Science
3.0 credits
Physics
STEM Physics
STEM Chemistry
Chemistry
STEM Chem
AP Biology
Any semester or full year course Any semester or full year course
Social Studies
3.0 credits
Social Studies 9 Social Studies 10 Any semester or full year course Any semester or full year course
Health
1.0 credit
Health 1 Health 2 This requirement may also be taken in grade 11 This requirement may also be taken in grade 12
Physical Education
1.0 credits
PE 1 Any PE course This requirement may also be taken in grade 11 This requirement may also be taken in grade 12
Career Development
0.5 credits
Students attend Beaver Lodge class during their four years of high school. The required 0.5 career education credit is earned during those years, but awarded at the end of the senior year. Each grade level has established activities that include self-assessment, and reflection, development of a plan and profile, career research through the Career Information System (CIS), career related learning experiences (CRLE’s), writing a resume, completing a mock interview, and culminating in the design of a Senior Project.
Applied Arts,
Fine Arts,
World
Language
3.0 credits
Three credits must be earned in the following areas: music, visual arts, theater arts, business education, technology education, automotive technology, computer, or world language. Most colleges and universities require a minimum of two years world language, more competitive colleges may require three years. (Honors recommended for students interested in challenging themselves)
Electives
5.5 credits
All students, with the assistance of the parent/guardian and school counselor, will select a combination of elective courses which best meets the needs of their post-high school graduation plans. Additional courses, beyond the required classes in language arts, math, social studies or science, count as elective credits.
Total Credits 6-7 credits 6-7 credits 6-7 credits 6-7 credits

Freshman Program of Study

Freshmen are required to take seven academic classes and Beaver Lodge during each semester of 9th grade.

Freshmen courses offerings include:

Language ArtsLit/Comp 91.0 cr
Social StudiesSoc. St. 91.0
SciencePhysics1.0
 STEM Phy*1.0
 STEM Chem*1.0
MathAlg/Geo/Stats 11.0
 Geometry1.0
HealthHealth 10.5
PEPE 10.5
World Lang(Recommended) 
Electives/Other 2.0

* teacher recommendation required

Sophomore Program of Study

Sophomores are required to take seven academic classes and Beaver Lodge during each semester of 10th grade.

Sophomore course offerings include:

Language ArtsLit/Comp 101.0 cr
Social StudiesSoc. St. 101.0
ScienceChemistry1.0
 STEM Chem*1.0
 AP Biology*1.0
MathAlg/Geo/Stats 1*1.0
 Geometry*1.0
 Geo Survey*1.0
 Algebra 2*1.0
 Adv. Algebra 21.0
HealthHealth 20.5
PE 0.5
World Lang(Recommended) 
Electives/Other 2.0

* teacher recommendation required

Junior Program of Study

Juniors are required to take seven academic classes and Beaver Lodge during each semester of their 11th grade year.

Junior course offerings include:

Language ArtsAmerican Lit.1.0
 AP Eng. Lang.1.0
Social StudiesAny semester or0.5/1.0
 full year course 
ScienceAny semester or0.5/1.0
 full year course 
MathAlgebra 21.0
 Geometry1.0
 Adv. Algebra 21.0
 AP Stats1.0
 FST1.0
 Pre-Calculus1.0
World Lang.(Recommended) 
Electives/Other 2.0

Senior Program of Study

Seniors are required to take six academic classes during each semester of their 12th grade year, plus Beaver Lodge.

Senior course offerings include:

Language ArtsFull year Lit.1.0
Social StudiesAny semester or0.5/1.0
 full year course 
ScienceAny semester or0.5/1.0
 full year course 
MathAdv. Algebra 21.0
 FST1.0
 Pre-Calculus1.0
 AP Stats1.0
 AP Calc AB1.0
 AP Calc BC1.0
World Lang.(Recommended) 
Electives/Other 1 - 2

 

Student Name:   BHS ID:

Current Grade (circle): 9 10 11 12 Today's Date:

Freshman Year

Credit
Required Course
1.0
Social Studies 9
1.0
Lit. & Comp 9
0.5
Health 1
0.5
P.E. 1
1.0
Science  
1.0
Math  



Electives

 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   

Must total 7 credits

Sophomore Year

Credit
Required Course
1.0
Social Studies 10
1.0
Lit. & Comp 10
0.5
Health 2
0.5
P.E.  
1.0
Science  
1.0
Math  



Electives

 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   

Must total 7 credits

Junior Year

Credit
Required Course
1.0
Social Studies  
1.0
Language Arts  
1.0
Science  
1.0
Math  



Electives

 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   

Must total 7 credits

Senior Year

Credit
Required Course
1.0
Language Arts



Electives

 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   

Must total 7 credits

Note: It is required to take two years of the same World Language in sequence if you plan to apply to a four-year university.

AVID

AVIDAVID logo
Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) is an academic elective course that prepares students for college readiness and success, and it is scheduled during the regular school day as a year-long course. Each week, students receive instruction utilizing a rigorous college preparatory curriculum, tutor-facilitated study groups, motivational activities and academic success skills. In AVID, students participate in activities that incorporate strategies focused on writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization and reading to support their academic growth.

What is AVID?
AVID, Advancement Via Individual Determination, is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to closing the achievement gap by preparing all students for college and other post-secondary opportunities. Established more than 30 years ago with one teacher in one classroom, AVID today impacts more than 800,000 students in 44 states and 16 other countries/territories. See more at www.avid.org

What AVID Does
Simply, AVID trains educators to use proven practices in order to prepare students for success in high school, college, and a career, especially students traditionally underrepresented in higher education.

How AVID Works
AVID brings research-based strategies and curriculum to educational institutions in elementary, secondary, and higher education. The AVID System annually provides more than 30,000 educators with training and methodologies that develop students’ critical thinking, literacy, and math skills across all content areas throughout the entire campus, in what we call Schoolwide AVID.

AVID Methods:

AVID Workshop 9 E909

One year/1.0 Elective Credit
Grade: 9
Prerequisite: by application only

Some students will have previous experience with AVID at the middle grades, and some students will be experiencing AVID for the first time. Either way, the ninth grade AVID Elective course will serve as a review of the AVID philosophy and strategies. Students will work on academic and personal goals and communication, adjusting to the high school setting. Students will increase awareness of their personal contributions to their learning, as well as their involvement in their school and community. There is an emphasis on analytical writing, focusing on personal goals and thesis writing. Students will work in collaborative settings, learning how to participate in collegial discussions and use sources to support their ideas and opinions. Students will prepare for and participate in college entrance and placement exams, while refining study skills and test-taking, note-taking, and research techniques. They will take an active role in field trip and guest speaker preparations and presentations. Their college research will include financial topics and building their knowledge on colleges and careers of interest.

AVID Workshop 10 E910

One year1.0 /Elective Credit
Grade: 10
Prerequisite: by application only

During the tenth grade AVID Elective course, students will refine the AVID strategies to meet their independent needs and learning styles. Students will continue to refine and adjust their academic learning plans and goals, increasing awareness of their actions and behaviors. As students increase the rigorous course load and school/community involvement, they will refine their time management and study skills accordingly. Students will expand their writing portfolio to include: analyzing prompts, supporting arguments and claims, character analysis and detailed reflections. Students will also analyze various documents, in order to participate in collaborative discussions and develop leadership skills in those settings. Students will expand their vocabulary use, continuing to prepare for college entrance exams and preparation. Text analysis will focus on specific strategies to understand complex texts. Lastly, students will narrow down their college and careers of interest, based on personal interests and goals.

AVID Workshop 11E911

One year/1.0 Elective Credit
Grade: 11
Prerequisite: by application only

The eleventh grade AVID Elective course is the first part in a junior/senior seminar course that focuses on writing and critical thinking expected of first- and second-year college students. In addition to the academic focus of the AVID seminar, there are college-bound activities, methodologies and tasks that should be undertaken during the junior year to support students as they apply to four-year universities and confirm their postsecondary plans.

AVID Workshop 12E912

One year/1.0 Elective Credit
Grade: 12
Prerequisite: by application only

The AVID Elective twelfth grade course is the second part in a junior/senior seminar course that focuses on writing and critical thinking expected of first- and second-year college students. Students will complete a final research essay project from research conducted in their junior year in AVID. In addition to the academic focus of the AVID senior seminar, there are college-bound activities, methodologies and tasks that should be achieved during the senior year that support students as they apply to four-year universities and confirm their postsecondary plans. All AVID seniors are required to develop and present a portfolio representing their years of work in the AVID program, as well as complete the requirements for the seminar course.

AVID Tutor E312

One year/1.0 Elective Credit
Grades: 11 & 12
Prerequisite: by application only - available in Counseling Center

AVID tutors work to cultivate the organization, reading, writing, collaboration, and inquiry skills central to the AVID curriculum. Tutors must be comfortable leading small groups during projects, Socratic seminars, and Tutorials. On Tutorial days the AVID Tutor will facilitate a group of seven or less students through a structured inquiry process while taking notes, tracking participation, and encouraging participation of the group members. The primary focus is academics, but note that strong candidates should serve as a good role model by maintaining passing grades in all classes, good attendance, and appropriate behavior inside and outside of school. Six hours of training is provided in September. (Application Required)

Dual Language

Dual Language Program
Previously known as the Two-Way Immersion program, the mission of Beaverton High School’s Dual-Language program is to honor and develop multilingual, multiliterate and multicultural students through rigorous, culturally inclusive education. Building upon the notion that bilingualism is a positive asset, students develop a high level of academic biliteracy in both English and Spanish while earning credits towards graduation. All Dual Language courses have the same learning targets and credits as their respective English courses, but these courses are taught almost entirely in Spanish. This program is designed as the continuation of Whitford and Meadow Park’s Two-Way Immersion program, but also serve newcomers and students wishing to advance their native Spanish language. The Dual Language program culminates in Advanced Placement Spanish and an Oregon Seal of Biliteracy awarded on a student’s diploma.

La misión del Programa de Lenguaje Dual de la escuela preparatoria Beaverton High School, anteriormente conocido como programa de Doble Inmersión, es honrar y desarrollar estudiantes multilingües, multiculturales a través de una educación rigurosa, culturalmente incluyente. Basándose en la idea de que el bilingüismo tiene un valor positivo, los estudiantes desarrollan un alto nivel de habilidad académica en inglés y español mientras obtienen créditos necesarios para su graduación. Todos los cursos de Lenguaje Dual tienen las mismas metas de aprendizaje y créditos que sus respectivos cursos en inglés, pero estos cursos se enseñan casi completamente en español. Este programa está diseñado para ser la continuación de los Programas de Whitford y Meadow Park, pero sirven también a los estudiantes recién llegados al país y a los estudiantes que deseen avanzar en su idioma nativo español.

El programa de Lenguaje Dual culmina en cursos de español de nivel avanzado y en un diploma con un Sello de Bilingüe del estado de Oregon.

Dual Language courses 2017-2018
See individual department sections for course descriptions.

Digital Media

Graduation Requirements
Three years of Applied Arts are required for graduation. These can be earned in several different departments.

Three years of Applied Arts are required for graduation. AA credit can be obtained from several different departments.

Computer Applications A411
PCC logo

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Computer Applications provides an overview of basic computer applications including Microsoft Windows, Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access), and integration of the applications. This course challenges students to work independently toward the goal of improving your computer literacy. Students may earn both HS credit and PCC Dual Credit.

Computer Graphics 1 F271
PCC logo

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Art 1

This course expands on basic graphic design principles to introduce the features of Adobe's digital image development software. The course highlights the image-editing features and techniques of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator to create and refine graphics and to interface efficiently in the production of web images and assets.

Students may earn both high school credit and PCC Dual Credit.

Computer Graphics 2 F272
PCC logo

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Art 1 & successful completion of Computer Graphics

This course expands upon digital design skills learned in Computer Graphics 1 and introduces Adobe Flash to build and edit animation and graphics using the Flash interface. Adobe InDesign (desktop publishing software) is then utilized to create effective publications such as print and digital announcements, fliers, advertisements, and reports. This course covers the processes to create, import, and manipulate text and/or graphics through use of software features.

Students may earn both high school credit and PCC Dual Credit.

Computer Animation F480

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

This course uses the first quarter to introduce the basic features of creating and editing animated movies and web graphics. It covers shape and motion tweening, masks, symbols, and basic scripting. The second quarter of Computer Animation explores 3-dimensional computer generated animation. Students learn to use 3D animation software and produce their own animation while learning about character design, storyboarding, character motion, and acting.

Video Journalism A231

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Students will learn media production through hands-on video projects. Class units include planning, camera operation, audio work, interviewing, copyright. Discussion includes story selection, information gathering and an introduction to broadcast equipment including professional cameras, soundboard, switcher, and broadcast graphics. Working in groups is essential as this class requires functioning in a supportive, collaborative and positive manner, just as demanded by the news reporting process.

TV News/Documentary A235

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Video Journalism or equivalent experience, consent of instructor.

Students will be responsible for news and events on The Stream, broadcast regularly from the high definition studio on the BHS campus. Students will continue skills of field-work and broadcast studio work. Ability to meet deadlines and work as part of a team are crucial to success in this class. Discussion includes news judgment and story selection, writing and editing copy, working with various video formats and other visuals, delivering the news across a closed cable network and preparing news in various formats.

Web Design A431
PCC logo

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Web Design is an introductory course in which students will learn to create web pages and sites using both a text editor with HTML code and the web design software Adobe DreamWeaver. The students often create sites with content of their own interest in this project-based curriculum. Some knowledge of computers and keyboarding would be helpful but is not required.

Students may earn both high school credit and PCC Dual Credit.

Engineering & Trades

Beaverton High School is currently developing an Engineering Career Pathway. The Engineering 1 course meets the year 1 requirement, and the Drafting & Design and Programming courses each meet elective requirements, for the developing Engineering pathway. Further requirements and opportunities for this pathway will be presented in 2017-2018 and beyond.

Engineering I: Engineer Your World A560

One year/1.0 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10,11,12
Prerequisite: None

Engineer Your World is a one-year high school engineering curriculum developed by the Cockrell School of Engineering at University of Texas at Austin in collaboration with the National Science Foundation and NASA. This hands-on, project-based course emphasizes the historic achievements and contemporary challenges of engineers, the engineering design process, and the skills and habits of mind that engineers find most essential in their work. This course meets NGSS standards for high school Engineering, Technology and Society (HS-ETS 1-1,1-2, 1-3 and 1-4). Our first unit focuses on establishing norms for all of our group interactions and for effective documentation of our projects in our Engineering Journals. The next five units all involve designing, building, and testing devices or systems of devices to accomplish specific tasks in response to customer needs. Each unit also emphasizes several specific aspects of the work of professional engineers. The remaining units are: 2. Pinhole Cameras (Discovering Design), 3. Earthquake Simulator (Data Acquisition and Analysis), 4. Piggy Flashlights (Reverse Engineering and Redesign), 5. Aerial Imaging (Systems), and 6. Robotics (Automation and Control).

Engineering II: Engineer Your World A561

One year/1.0 Elective credit
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisite: Engineering I

Continuation of the exploration of engineering with a deeper look into many of the engineering concepts and processes using higher math and science.

Drafting & Design/CADD 1 A531
PCC logo

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: None

This course teaches the skills necessary for communication within the industries of design, architecture, engineering, drafting, construction, and many other career choices. Students will learn basic terms, practices and conventions used in industry and how to use several computer-aided drafting & design (CADD) programs.

Students may earn both high school credit and PCC Dual Credit.

Drafting & Design/CADD 2 A532
PCC logo

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9,10,11,12

Prerequisite: Drafting & Design/CADD 1

This course teaches more advanced skills of solid modeling and basic three-dimensional rendering required for those students pursuing a career in architecture & design. Students explore basic design of a residential building with discussions of environmental impact and sustainable building practices. Students will ultimately produce the working drawings needed to obtain a building permit for the home they design.

Students may earn both high school credit and P.C.C. Dual Credit.

Computer Programming 1 A451

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: None

Programming 1 is for students highly interested in a career in computer science. Computer Programming teaches problem solving using the C++ programming language. Students are challenged to solve problems using the programmers’ tools of input, output, operations, decisions, loops and functions. It is highly recommended that students complete Algebra 1 & have keyboarding skills.

Computer Programming 2 A452

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9,10,11,12

Prerequisite: C or better in Programming 1

This course is designed for students who wish to do more advanced studies in computer programming. The model of Object Oriented Programming (OOP) will be utilized in programming simple games. May explore software and languages for mobile app creation.

English Language Arts

Graduation requirements
Four years of English Language Arts are required for graduation.

NINTH AND TENTH GRADE

Literature and Composition 9 L605

One year/1.0 LA credit
Grade 9

All 9th grade students will be enrolled in this course and can receive a year's credit in English. Students will develop their skills in reading literature, writing, and discussion. They will read a variety of novels, poems, plays, and short stories. Students will write in a variety of forms, including expository and narrative essays, poetry, and narration. They will develop skills in speech, critical thinking, and analytical and expressive writing. Honors option available.

Literature and Composition 10 L610

One year/1 LA credit
Grade 10

Students will further develop their skills in reading literature, writing, and speaking. They will read a variety of novels, poems, plays, essays, and short stories and will write in a variety of forms, including narrative, persuasive, and analytical essays. Students will develop skills in research, speech, critical reading, and analytical and expressive writing. Honors option available and recommended for students planning to take AP courses as juniors and seniors.

Literature and Composition 9/10 L605/L610

One year/1.0 LA credit
Grade 9
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Score in the 97% on at least two English Language Arts related sections of the ASPIRE Test or other nationally normed test

This course is a compacted version of Literature and Composition 9 and Literature and Composition 10. Students will cover content at an accelerated rate in order to be prepared to enroll in AP Language as a sophomore. See the course descriptions for both Literature and Composition 9 and Literature and Composition 10 for information about topics of study.

ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH GRADE

American Literature and Composition L510

One year/1 LA Credit
Grade 11

Students will continue to develop their skills in reading literature, writing, and speaking. Students will study classic and modern American literature; they will read a variety of novels, poems, plays, and short stories. Students will write in a variety of forms, including expository, narrative, persuasive, and analytical essays. Students will further develop skills in research, speech, and critical thinking.

Exploration Literature and Composition L518

One year/1 LA Credit
Grade 12

Students will continue to develop their skills in analyzing literature, writing in a variety of forms, and engaging in class discussion and oral presentations. Reading selections will include novels, such a King Rat, Kite Runner, Into Thin Air, Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451 as well as films, such as Schindler's List, Memento, Mystic River and Gattaca. Plays, short stories and poetry that link to the major works in the course will provide the students with greater understanding and insight into the characters, themes and symbols emerging from the class materials.

Nonfiction Literature & Composition L533

One year/1 LA Credit
Grade 11

Students will continue to develop their skills in reading literature, writing, and speaking. Students will read and respond to works of nonfiction, as well as view and respond to film documentaries. Sample readings include: The Color of Water, Into the Wild, There Are No Children Here, Farewell to Manzanar, and Night.

Students will write in a variety of forms, including expository, narrative, persuasive, and analytical essays. Students will further develop skills in research, speech, and critical thinking.

Mythology/Bible Literature and CompositionL516

One year/1 LA Credit
Grade 12

Students will continue to develop their skills in analyzing literature, writing in a variety of forms, and engaging in class discussion and oral presentations. Reading selectiosn will include Norse, Greek and Celtic Myths anthologies, The Fellowship of the Ring, The Bible, The Plague, The Screwtape Letters and Lord Foul's Pan's Labyrinth and Inception. Plays, short stories and poetry that link to the major works in the course will provide the students with greater understanding and insight into the characters, themes and symbols emerging from the class materials.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH

These courses develop college-level skills in composition and reading. Students will read extensively in classical as well as modern literature, practice composition and research skills needed in college, and prepare for Advanced Placement Examinations.
Taking the examinations is encouraged, but not mandatory. AP English courses have summer reading assignment requirements. Please go to the Beaverton HS web site at www.beaverton.k12.or.us/beaverton, to the Curriculum link.

AP English Language L810
AP logo

One year/1 LA credit
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Teacher Approval

This course is a college-level class focused on rhetoric and its uses throughout society, sophisticated analysis and critical reading of primarily nonfiction texts and writing that centers on the ability to construct sound and valid arguments. Students will investigate the science of language use and apply this knowledge to their own compositions and will practice writing at a level necessary to be successful on the Advanced Placement exam and in college. This course has a required summer assignment.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

AP English Literature L820
AP logo

One year/1 LA credit
Grade 12
Prerequisite: Teacher Approval

This year-long course is designed to engage seniors in critical analysis and enjoyment of literature. Through talking and writing about complex literature, students deepen their understanding of how writers use language to enhance meaning and engage audiences. They write essays in and out of class. In these ways, they prepare for the Advanced Placement exam in English Literature in the spring. Those who pass the exam may qualify for advanced credit at various colleges and universities. Because of this, students in this course are expected to meet college- level expectations. Reading selections include Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Henry James' Daisy Miller and The Turn of the Screw, James Joyce's Dubliners, William Shakespeare's Hamlet, Toni Morrison's Beloved, Edward Albee's Zoo Story and American Dream, and other novels and plays, as well as poetry by William Shakespeare, John Donne, Emily Dickinson, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, and a variety of others. This course has a required summer assignment.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

English Literature Survey L514

One year/1.0 LA credit
Grade 12

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA and Teacher Recommendation

English Literature 204 is an opportunity for students to take a college-level PSU course while on the Beaverton High School campus through the PSU Challenge program.

In English 204, students will survey English literature of the period from Old English (Beowolf, etc. c. 800) to the 18th Century (John Milton). The focus of study will be concerned with significant works and literary movements. Students should be equipped with a basic knowledge of literary terms and be prepared to think about, write, and discuss in depth the literature studied. The PSU course component will require a fee of $220.

Beaverton High is committed to providing financial assistance to students in need.

ELECTIVES - NO LANGUAGE ARTS CREDIT

Speech 1 L301X

One semester/0.5 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Cost: $85 Activity fee (subject to change, fee waivers available from athletic office)

This elective is designed for students to develop their speaking skills in accordance to the state standards. Students will use organization, writing, researching and performance skills to formulate various types of speeches and/or debates. Students will be required to participate in at least three tournaments each semester outside of class time at an additional cost of approximately $5 per tournament.

Speech 2 L302X

One semester/0.5 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Cost: $85 Activity fee (subject to change, fee waivers available from athletic office)

This elective is designed for students at a competitive level. More emphasis will be given to interpretation of written work and debate concepts. Students will be required to participate in at least four tournaments each semester out of class time at an additional cost of approximately $8 per tournament.

Creative Writing Workshop L410X

One semester/0.5 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

This course is designed for students who wish to focus on writing poetry, short stories, drama and other creative pieces. Students will write in a workshop setting with both peer and teacher response. Students will keep portfolios of their writing from which they will select a minimum of one piece per quarter for publication in a variety of media. NO LANGUAGE ARTS CREDIT.

Newspaper A207

One year/1 Elective credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Computer skills and coursework in photography recommended.

Students gain working experience as writers, editors, page designers, photographers, graphic artists and business managers by producing The Hummer, the school newspaper. Ability to meet deadlines and work as part of a team are crucial to success in this class. All students will be expected to master the rules of style and conventions. They also will be expected to read and comment regularly on news articles, features, and editorials in major newspapers. NO LANGUAGE ARTS CREDIT.

Yearbook A206

One year/1 Elective credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Application and consent of instructor

This publication class (The Beaver staff) is designed to provide students with practical learning experience in designing and publishing the yearbook. NO LANGUAGE ARTS CREDIT.

Reading Workshop L206

One semester/0.5 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10

Prerequisite: Placement by counseling department

Learn strategies to improve reading skills, increase reading speed and comprehension, build vocabulary, and read for pleasure. This class provides additional support to required Lit/Comp courses.

Writing Workshop L208

One semester/0.5 Elective credit
Grade 10

Prerequisite: Placement by counseling department

This course provides instruction in basic language skills, integrating reading, writing, speaking, and listening, while placing emphasis on the progress of individual students. Course content may include vocabulary building, improving spelling and grammar, developing writing and composition skills, reading silently or aloud, and improving listening and comprehension abilities.

AP logo

 

AP courses prepare students to take AP exams in the spring. College credit may be available.

PSU logo

 

PSU Challenge Program courses offer discounted PSU college credit for courses taught at BHS.

Graduation Requirements
Some courses meet specific graduation requirements; others may award elective credit. See your case coordinator for specific information.

English Language Learners

The mission of the Beaverton School District English Language Support Program is to implement researched instructional approaches that ensure English proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening and are in compliance with Federal and State Guidelines. English language proficiency is defined as the acquisition of language functions and grammatical forms in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Instructional approaches which foster English language proficiency include a rigorous, thematic curriculum which is inclusive of students' unique backgrounds and cultures, group and individual learning opportunities, and intensive language development through reading and writing workshops.

Beginning English Language Development N205

One year/2 Elective credits
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: ELD Teacher Approval

This course is designed for students who are newly arrived to the United States or have limited English skills. Thematic units will incorporate Oregon English Language Proficiency (ELP) standards in speaking, reading, listening, and writing.

Early Intermediate English Language Development N208

One year/2 Elective credits
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: ELD Teacher Approval

This course is designed for students who have an early intermediate level of proficiency in English and have acquired basic skills in Beginning Language Development. Thematic units will continue to incorporate Oregon ELP standards in speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Upon ELD teacher approval, students at the Early Intermediate English Language Development level may concurrently take sheltered content classes.

Intermediate English Language Development N210

One year/1 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: ELD Teacher Approval

This course is designed for students who have an intermediate level of proficiency in English and have acquired basic skills in Early Intermediate Language Development. Thematic units will continue to incorporate

Early Advanced English Language Development N215

One year/1 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: ELD Teacher Approval

This course is designed for students who have an early advanced level of proficiency in English and have acquired language skills through Intermediate English Language Development. Thematic units will continue to develop the Oregon ELP standards in speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Opportunities will be given for collecting and scoring work samples in the areas of speaking, reading and writing. Early Advanced English Language Development students may concurrently take a sheltered class in a needed content area upon ELD teacher request.

Advanced English Language Development N220

One year/1 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: ELD teacher approval

This course is designed for students who have an advanced proficiency in English and who are preparing to exit the English Language Development program. Opportunities will be given to collect proficient work samples in reading, writing and speaking in addition to other essential elements of the exit portfolio.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT LITERACY CLASSES COMMON COURSE CURRICULUM

In order for all students to meet the Mission of the Beaverton School District's English Language Support Program, additional literacy support may be necessary for some students with little or no prior education, or English Language Learners who are significantly below their peers in reading and writing. In schools with a significant number of same-language students with literacy needs, a primary language literacy class will be provided. Effective literacy instruction includes multicultural, age appropriate literature, and instructional practices appropriate for English language learners.

Literature & Composition I L601N

One year/1 Language Arts credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: ELD Teacher Approval

This course is aligned with the Oregon State Standards for Language Arts. The course is designed and taught for the beginning English Language Learner. Through the use of a variety of strategies and curriculum design, students have access to the same content as Literature and Composition 9. The combination of language, content, learning objectives, and the creation of comprehensible input, improves student understanding and proficiency in Language Arts skills. Access and support for learning will be provided by both the Language Arts and ESL departments.

Literature & Composition II L602N

One year/1 Language Arts credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: ELD Teacher Approval

This course is aligned with the Oregon State Standards for Language Arts. The course is designed and taught for the Early Intermediate English Language Learner. Through the use of a variety of strategies and curriculum design, students have access to the same content as Literature and Composition 9 & 10. The combination of language, content, learning objectives, and the creation of comprehensible input, improves student understanding and proficiency in Language Arts skills. Access and support for learning will be provided by both Language Arts and ESL departments.

SHELTERED/RELATED COURSES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELL'S)

The term sheltered refers to the strategies used to provide access to a given curriculum. Through the combination of language, content, and learning objectives, the goal is to create comprehensible input, improve student understanding and proficiency, and to demonstrate higher levels of achievement in skills for the given content area.

Sheltered Physics C611N

One year/1.0 Science credit
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

This is a lab-based physics course designed for English Language Learners. Using the processes of scientific inquiry, engineering design, and critical thinking, students will discover and apply patterns in such major physics topics as motion, forces, energy, waves (and electromagnetism). An important aim of the course is to develop and build students' math abilities, problem solving skills, scientific literacy, and technical communication that will be useful in later science courses. ELL's have the same access to content as regular Physics students; however, more emphasis is placed on vocabulary and content development through a variety of learning strategies to meet ELL language proficiency.

Social Studies I S2101N

One year/1.0 Social Studies credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: ELD teacher approval. Beginning ELD students only

This course is designed for students who are in the early stages of English language development and need additional language support to understand Social Science concepts. Instruction aligns with the state Social Studies Standards. Each year, the class will focus on a different aspect of the social studies curriculum including Geography, Global Studies, American Studies, or Government.

Sheltered Social Studies 9 S225N

One year/1.0 Social Studies credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Teacher and ESL Dept. recommendation

This course provides students opportunities to work on social science skills around three 20th century themes: role of government, imperialism, and international relations. Instruction aligns with the state Social Studies Standards. ELL's have the same access to content as regular Social Studies 9 students; however, more emphasis is placed on vocabulary and content development through a variety of learning strategies to meet ELL language proficiency.

Intro To Health Careers H390

One Year/1 Elective credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Intermediate & above ELD students.

The focus of this course is to introduce Health Careers to Intermediate or higher ELD students in preparation for taking Health Careers courses. Students need to be motivated with an interest in pursuing a health career after high school. This course includes an introduction to the human body, health care guest speakers and an emphasis on study skills and language acquisition.

Beaverton High School ELL Program
Recommended Sequence of Coursework

Students become eligible for ESL services via Intake testing, and the scores determine ELL Profile of 1-5. The Profile determines recommended courses. Where scheduling conflicts with SPED occur, a students' IEP needs are given priority over ELL services.

PROFILE 1 STUDENTS

CORE classes:

Optional classes:

PROFILE 2 STUDENTS

CORE classes:

Optional classes:





PROFILE 3 STUDENTS

CORE classes:

Optional classes:


Proficient/Exited or Waived Services: Monitoring Status for 24 months from date of exit.

Program name:
Monitoring I OR II

Student grades are reviewed and interventions are determined for those in danger of failing classes.



PROFILE 5 STUDENTS

Mainstream CORE classes:

Optional classes:

PROFILE 4 STUDENTS

Mainstream CORE classes:

Optional classes:

Health Careers

Graduation requirements
Human Anatomy and Physiology is a 1.0 Science credit course. Other Health Careers courses are for elective credit.

Health Careers I H431
PCC logo

One Year/1 Elective credit, held on Beaverton HS campus only

Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: District Options On-line Application Process and Attendance at the Mandatory Orientation.

Fees: $35 for program t-shirt, First Aid and Healthcare Professional CPR certifications and lab supplies. (Need based scholarships are available)

PCC Credit Options: Health 252 First Aid Basics and Beyond (4 PCC credits) and CG130H Introduction to Today's Careers (2 PCC credits)


This full year introductory course is for the student who has an interest in exploring or pursuing a career in health services. Students will learn core knowledge and skills common to major health careers. Areas of emphasis are medical terminology, medical ethics, safety in health care, career exploration, self-assessment portfolios, and some basic health care skills. Students will be involved in community health projects such as elementary school health screenings, blood drives and other related community experience. These students have the opportunity to be involved with Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA), a pre-professional organization of potential health care workers. The Red Cross course, Responding to Emergencies is part of the curriculum in which students will explore and demonstrate basic first aid, first aid in remote settings, healthcare professional CPR for adult, child and infant, and educational training in Automated External Defibrillation (AED).

Human Anatomy and Physiology C425
PCC logo

One year/1 Science credit, held on Beaverton HS campus only

Grade 11, 12

Prerequisite: 2 years of core science credits

PCC credit options: Biology 121 & 122, Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology (8 PCC credits) or

OIT Credit Options: Biology 103, Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology (4 credits OIT)

This year-long class specializes in the study of the human body. Exercises include the identification of the cells and tissues and the body systems (skin, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and urinary) as well as investigations in how those systems function. Lecture and discussions are complemented by labs involving microscopic studies, hands on discovery labs and some dissections. This class is for any junior or senior interested in the science of the human body; it also fulfills the science prerequisite to be accepted into Advanced Health Careers. This science course is not a requirement for the Nurse Assisting pathway.

Advanced Health Careers H440/441
PCC logo

One year/2 Elective credits/Meets daily, held on Beaverton HS campus only

Grade 12

Prerequisites: Health Careers I and Human Anatomy and Physiology

Fees: Program/Uniform costs are approximately $100 per year. (Need based scholarships are available)

PCC Credit Options: MP 111 Medical Terminology (4 PCC credits) and CG130H Introduction to Today's Careers (2 PCC credits)

This course is designed for senior students who have successfully completed Health Careers and Human Anatomy. First semester curriculum includes mastery of basic patient care skills, introductory pathophysiology of common diseases, professional skills and medical terminology. The curriculum also includes guest lecturers from diverse healthcare fields who explain their career pathways, share their expertise and provide updates on current practices. Second semester, students will be placed in the community to explore career options with healthcare professionals. Among the clinical sites offered to students are hospital, medical, dental, veterinary medicine, physical and occupational therapy, speech and rehabilitation, fitness, sports medicine, and medical social service. Students are encouraged to continue their membership in Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA). Advanced Health Careers provides students with a realistic view of career options. Clinical experiences allow students to collect valuable information facilitating educated decisions regarding their future in college or the workplace.

Nurse Assisting 1 H442

One Year/1 Elective credit, held on Beaverton High School campus only.

Grade: 12
Prerequisite: Heath Careers 1

Fees: Program/Uniform costs are approximately $75 as well as $106 paid to OSBN at the conclusion of the course for state CNA certification board exam. (Need based scholarships are available)

CCC Credit Options: NUR 100 Nurse Assisting (7 CCC credits)

This full year course is designed to prepare students to perform routine nursing assistant tasks to clients in the following venues: long-term and skilled nursing care facilities, home care and community health agencies. There will be a minimum of 80 hours of classroom/lab instruction as mandated by the Oregon State Board of Nursing and 82 hours of clinical training that prepare NA students perform routine assistant tasks to clients in hospitals, long-term, community and skilled care facilities. Students will sit for the state licensing examination at the end of this course.

To apply to the Health Careers program, complete the Beaverton School District Common Option Application available at www.beaverton.k12.or.us/options/ or from your school counseling office. Have your counselor sign your application and submit it along with signing up for Health Careers on your high school forecasting form. A lottery will be held if there are more applicants than space available. In order to be included in the lottery applicants must attend a mandatory informational meeting in the spring.

health-careers-flowchart

Health / Physical Education

Graduation Requirements
Health 1 and Health 2 are required for graduation.
Two semesters of PE are required for graduation.

Health 1 H201X

One semester/0.5 HE credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Students will have the opportunity to explore health-related issues such as mental and emotional health, violence prevention, alcohol, tobacco & other drugs, human sexuality, including sexually transmitted infections, and unintentional injury prevention. The focus in this class is on accessing information and developing strategies for improving communication, problem solving, and decision-making.

Health 2 H202X

One semester/0.5 HE credit
Grades: 10, 11,12
Prerequisite: Health 1

Students will have the opportunity to explore health topics & issues such as: stress & ways to manage stress, fitness & nutrition, drug use & abuse and terminology and sexual health including sexually transmitted infections. The focus in this class is on decision making, accessing information and becoming a health literate individual through the use of BSD adopted assessments and standards.

All students must complete one semester (0.5 credit) of health prior to taking this course. Freshmen are required to take Health 1 during one semester of their freshman year.

Physical Education 1 P430X

One semester/0.5 PE1 credit
Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None

This class will cover skills, rules, strategies and training techniques for a variety of individual, team and movement activities both competitive and recreational in nature. Activities could include soccer, football, volleyball, ping pong, badminton, yoga, and dance. Activities will vary due to weather conditions and facility availability. Students will learn to make responsible life-long fitness choices through practical applications of fitness and wellness concepts. Focus of this course will be fitness, rule implementation, skill development, teamwork and sportsmanship. Grades will be based on daily participation, knowledge of sports/activities, proficiency, and fitness assessments.

Weight Training P401X

One semester/0.5 PE2 credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: PE1

The weight training class is designed for students who are serious about working out and physical improvement and/or athletic development. This class emphasizes total body development including upper and lower body, core training and flexibility. Class is structured so all levels of students benefit from beginner to elite. Physical development is monitored and evaluated, but assessment is based on participation and effort.

Flexibility & Strength Techniques P415

One semester/0.5 PE2 credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: PE1

The goal of this class is to calm the body and mind through a variety of standing and seated postures. Students will have the opportunity to develop strength, flexibility, coordination and balance, as well as improve body alignment. These techniques encourage greater flexibility and suppleness in the joints and muscles while providing a total-body workout. Assessment in this class is based on participation and effort.

Net Games P530X

One semester/0.5 PE2 credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: PE1

This class will focus on five sports that involve the use of a racquet: tennis, aerial tennis, ping pong, pickle ball, and badminton. The class will teach proper technique, strategies and both individual/dual play. This class is recommended for the student looking to improve individual aspects of court movement, swing technique and the strategy involved in these activities. Focus of this course will be fitness, rule implementation, skill development, teamwork and sportsmanship. Grades will be based on daily participation, knowledge of sports/activities, proficiency, and fitness assessments.

Team Sports P505X

One semester/0.5 PE2 credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: PE1

This class will concentrate on five sports that involve the use of a ball in the play of the game: football, soccer, basketball, volleyball and softball. This class is recommended for students looking to improve in the team aspects of these sports. Focus of this course will be fitness, rule implementation, skill development, teamwork and sportsmanship. Grades will be based on daily participation, knowledge of sports/activities, proficiency, and fitness assessments.

Fitness P420X

One semester/0.5 PE2 credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: PE1

This class will have a cross training focus and is designed for individuals who want to improve their overall fitness level. The class will revolve around the increase of the individual fitness level in the areas of muscular endurance, aerobic conditioning, flexibility and whole body fitness. The class will instruct in fitness testing, goal setting, nutrition, proper training technique to specific fitness activities and personal fitness program design.

Marketing

If you are interested in entrepreneurship, marketing, public relations, management, advertising, or digital media, the Marketing Department has the program for you! In addition to classroom instruction, you may earn FREE college credit and valuable hands- on experience during Week of Wishes and in The Pond, our student store. You will also have the opportunity to meet and network with industry leaders and participate in field studies in New York City, Los Angeles, Miami, and Orlando, Florida.

Marketing I B601
PCC logo

One year/1 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Open to students who are interested in learning about the many activities, responsibilities, and services involved with business and marketing. In Marketing I, the student will be exposed to branding, selling, advertising, communications, merchandising, fashion and retail, travel and tourism, green marketing, management, and product technology.

Marketing 2 B602
PCC logo

One year/1 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Marketing I

Marketing 2 course description: Marketing II is a continuation of Marketing I with a focus on marketing from a business standpoint. Content includes advertising, sales promotion, market research, visual merchandising and organization and employee/customer relations. Students may earn both HS credit and PCC Dual Credit.

Sports & Event Marketing B515
PCC logo

One year/1 AA credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

Sports Marketing is an introduction to the intersection of sports, entertainment, business, and society through project management including product development, pricing, licensing, and sponsorship. Throughout the year, students study the elements of event marketing and project management through the development of a comprehensive marketing plan for an event or organization. Students also gain hands-on experience during the production of Week of Wishes, consisting of Swishes & Wishes and Jam the Dam. Students may earn both HS credit and PCC Dual Credit.

Marketing Management B560
PCC logo

One year/1 AA credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

Marketing Management will focus on management and leadership skill development. Students will be required to apply their knowledge of management and leadership by planning, organizing and controlling activities for the student store, The Pond. This course emphasizes the importance of teamwork, responsibility, and decision-making. A large part of this class will be a hands on experience in The Pond. Both in the store and in the classroom, the student will work in areas such as promotions, sales operations, human relations, communication and more. Through work in the student store and the classroom, these students will be given a chance to explore those work fields open to marketing graduates. Students may earn both HS credit and PCC Dual Credit.

Digital Marketing B616
PCC logo

One year/1.0 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Instructor approval

Digital Marketing focuses on the development of effective marketing plans within a dynamic digital environment. Students will explore how to coordinate marketing initiatives across online and offline channels and between desktop and mobile audiences to show how various disciplines within digital marketing are interrelated. In addition to understanding the tools and techniques required to create a digital marketing plan, students both develop the skills to manage an online presence and put those skills into action. The focus of the class will be developing and implementing a holistic Internet and social media marketing strategy. Students may earn both HS credit and PCC Dual Credit.

Marketing Seminar/BA 101 B620
PSU logo
PCC logo

One year/1 AA credit
Grade: 12

Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

Marketing Seminar is the capstone course for the Business & Marketing program, and it challenges students to demonstrate and display their mastery of skills and knowledge through student-selected concentrations. During the first semester, students focus on leadership development through exploration of case studies and the creation of an advertising or entrepreneurship project. During the second semester, students develop their portfolio of experience through career-related learning opportunities and experiences. Students may earn both HS credit and PCC Dual Credit or credit in the PSU Excel program.

Personal Finance/FIN 218 B725
PSU logo
PCC logo

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Students study financial management and its application to family and personal resources. Family spending, saving, and investing are discussed along with an overview of basic economics, banking, employment, and capital management. Issues of budget management, consumer consumption, and consumer legislation are the focus of this course. Students explore such topics as rational spending, goods and services, the electronic economy, and risk management. Students may earn both HS credit and PCC Dual Credit or credit in the PSU Excel program.

Business & Marketing Communication/BA 205 B360
PSU logo
PCC logo

One Semester/.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

This course provides students the tools they need to collect, organize and present information in a business environment. Students will learn how to use library and Internet resources to collect information. Word processing, spreadsheet, and graphics applications will be used to organize and present business information. Students will be introduced to business report writing, developing and delivering a persuasive presentation, and electronic-mail methods for team based communication. Students may earn both HS credit and PSU Credit.

Marketing Pathway

The Marketing Pathway is designed to prepare students for employment and/or continuing education opportunities in business and marketing. Each course in this pathway prepares students to advance toward higher education as well as acquire immediate job skills. See specific pathway requirements.


PCC Dual Credit Program

PCC logo indicates PCC Dual Credit course. PCC Dual Credit courses offer students the opportunity to start their college education while in high school. PCC credits are transferable to all public universities within the Oregon University system and many other institutions outside the state. The cost to students is free.


PSU EXCEL: School of Business Dual Degree Program

Mathematics

Graduation Requirements
Three years of Math are required for graduation, not counting Math Skills.

The mathematics program at Beaverton High School is built on the belief that all students should have the opportunity to successfully learn mathematics. We wish to develop mathematically literate students who are able to explore, conjecture, reason logically and communicate their mathematics knowledge.

The State of Oregon requires three credits in mathematics for graduation. Many colleges recommend four years of mathematics. It is strongly recommended that students planning on future schooling take an advanced math course their senior year.

Algebra/Geometry/Statistics 1 M381

One year/1 Math credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: 8th Grade Math

Algebra/Geometry/Statistics l (AGS 1) is the first in a three course sequence that integrates the study of algebra, geometry, and statistical concepts and skills. In this first course, there is a strong focus on student skills in mathematical communication and using mathematical patterns and tools to model real-world scenarios. The algebraic focus is on arithmetic and geometric sequences and the corresponding linear and exponential equations, and solving linear equations and linear systems of equations. The geometric focus is on symmetry, transformations, congruence, and construction. The statistical focus is on tabular and graphical data models, with an emphasis on scatterplots.

Algebra/Geometry/Statistics 1 DL M381D

One year/1 Math credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: 8th Grade Math

This course is the same as AGS 1 except that it is taught primarily in Spanish.

Algebra/Geometry/Statistics II M382

One year/1 Math credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: AGS 1 [Algebra 1]

Algebra/Geometry/Statistics ll (AGS 2) is the second in a three course sequence that integrates the study of algebra, geometry, and statistical concepts and skills. As in AGS 1, there is a focus on student skills in mathematical communication and using mathematical patterns and tools to model real-world scenarios. The algebraic focus is mainly on quadratic functions and graphs. The geometric focus includes geometric figures, similarity and right triangle trigonometry, and conic sections. The statistics in this course focuses on the connection to probability: independence, conditional probabilities, interpreting the meaning of data sets, estimating probabilities from samples, and the appropriate use of Venn diagrams.

Algebra/Geometry/Statistics II DL M382D

One year/1 Math credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: AGS 1 [Algebra 1]

This course is the same as AGS II except that it is taught primarily in Spanish.

Algebra 2 M505

One year/1 Math credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Geometry, Geometry Survey, or AGS II

Topics include quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and polynomial functions, complex numbers and operations.

Advanced Algebra 2 M510

One year/1 Math credit

Prerequisite: Geometry or A/G/S II.

Topics include quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and polynomial functions, complex numbers, matrix operations, conic sections, trigonometric functions and identities, and single-variable data distributions.

Functions Statistics & Trigonometry (FST) M520

One year/ 1 Math credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II or Advanced Algebra II

Topics include logic, set theory, probability, transformations, linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational functions, trigonometric functions, single-variable data distributions, bi-variate data analysis.

Pre-Calculus M600
PCC logo

One year/1 Math credit

Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra II, FST or teacher recommendation

Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational functions, trigonometric functions and identities, vectors, complex numbers, logic, set theory. Students have the opportunity to earn PCC credit in Math 111/112.

AP Statistics M775
AP logo

One year/1 Math credit

Prerequisite: Functions Statistics & Trigonometry or Precalculus or concurrent enrollment in Precalculus

Topics include describing data distributions, collecting data using sampling and experiments, probability and random variables, and statistical inference.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

AP Calculus AB M750
AP logo

One year/ 1 Math credit
Prerequisite: Precalculus

Topics include limits, derivatives, rate problems, maxima and minima problems, anti-derivatives, techniques of integration, area and volume problems.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

AP Calculus BC M755
AP logo

One year/ 1 Math credit
Prerequisite: Calculus AB

Topics include a detailed review of Calculus AB, sequences and series, Taylor and Maclaurin series, and the calculus of parametric and polar functions.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

Math Sequence

Math Sequence flowchart

Performing Arts

Graduation requirements
3.0 credits of Applied Arts are required for graduation. Applied Arts credit can be obtained from several departments.

THEATRE

Theatre 1 F521

One semester/.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the world of theatre. It includes the study of basic acting techniques (voice, movement, imagination, pantomime, improvisation), terminology, and Western theatre origins. Students build teamwork, rehearsal, performance, production crew and critique skills.

Theatre 2 F522

One semester/ 0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Theatre 1 or teacher's permission

This course is an extension of Theatre 1. Students will learn about one or more of the following topics: techniques in acting, major developments in dramatic literature, major playwrights, hold leadership roles in class production work, and critical appreciation of the art.

Theatre Design F501

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None $10 lab fee

The focus of this course is the technical elements necessary to each and every production. Through a combination of hands-on participation and design projects, students will explore the world of technical theatre. Students will create original designs for sets, costumes, props, make-up/hair, and publicity packages.

Acting I F531

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Proficient in Theatre I or teacher's permission

Acting I builds on skills and techniques learned in Theatre I to expand the student actor's ability to build a character. Using unique inspirations such as hats, paintings, music, animals, and other people, students will learn to develop a character. Students will also learn in-depth character analysis skills that can be used to interpret any script. Through these character analysis techniques, students will improve their essential acting skills: rehearsal, performance, and critique.

Acting II F532

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Proficient in Acting I or teacher's permission

This course is a more advanced acting experience. Students fine-tune their acting skills through various projects/performances. Additionally, they have the opportunity to direct fellow actors and learn about historical & influential playwrights/artists.

Acting III F533

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Proficient in Acting II or teacher's permission

Acting III expands the advanced student's theatrical horizons. Students will continue to improve and refine acting skills while exploring new areas of theatre. Throughout the course, students will experience world theatre, while exploring alternative aspects of theatre (script writing, directing, designing). Students will also learn critical audition techniques that can be applied not only to theatre but also to all endeavors. Students will also continue to build their essential rehearsal, performance, and critique skills.

CHOIR

Treble Choir F620

One year/1.0 AA credit

Treble Choir F620X

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None, students may forecast for either one semester or one year

This class is designed to develop the fundamentals of vocal technique for treble voices. The class also focuses on music reading, performance and learning to sing in three part harmony. Music of various style periods is studied and performed at quarterly Beaverton choral concerts. Class members will have the opportunity to sing different voice parts to improve music reading and discover which vocal part they sing with greatest ease and beauty.

Bass/Tenor Choir F622

One year/1.0 AA credit

Bass/Tenor Choir F622X

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None, students may forecast for either one semester or one year

This class is designed to develop the fundamentals of vocal technique for bass/tenor voices. The class also focuses on music reading, performance and learning to sing in two and three part harmony. Music of various style periods is studied and performed at quarterly Beaverton choral concerts.

Concert Choir F630

One year/1.0 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Audition

Cost: $85 Activity Fee (subject to change, fee waivers available from athletic office)

Concert choir is for students with advanced musical skills. This choir studies and performs music literature of various style periods. Vocal technique, musicianship and performance skills are further developed. Students perform in concerts and festivals. Students who plan to try out for Concert Choir should sign up for a full year of Women's or Men's Choir to save a period in their schedules for Concert Choir. Auditions for the choir will be held in April. After the auditions, the counseling office will pull the forecasting sheets for the students accepted into Concert Choir and change their placement.

Advanced Vocal Ensemble F670

One year/1.0 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Concurrent participation in Concert Choir. Audition and choir director approval

Cost: Dress/tuxedo purchase

AVE is a select vocal ensemble that meets during "0" period, 6:50 a.m. every morning. Literature is partially selected by students and focuses on contemporary a cappella. This 16-20 voice group will compete in a cappella and other festivals as wells as BHS concerts. Auditions are held in May. Course is open to Concert Choir singers only.

 

ORCHESTRA

OrchestraF755

One Year/1 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Teacher approval

Orchestra provides students, who have intermediate-to-advanced orchestra skills, with opportunities to perform small chamber ensemble music and larger orchestra literature. Students will study and perform in a variety of classical musical styles.

BAND

Concert Band F705

One Year/1 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Previous participation in middle school band.

Cost: $85 Activity Fee, (subject to change, fee waivers available from athletic office)
Marching is not required, but is strongly recommended.

Concert Band is a performance class open primarily to freshmen and sophomores. The class will stress playing fundamentals, major, minor, and chromatic scales. Home practice is expected and private lessons encouraged. Concert Band members are eligible to participate in the solo/ensemble festival and may audition for All-State and All-Northwest performing groups. Members perform at school concerts and have the option of participating in the Marching Ensemble, which is highly recommended. As part of the band commitment, students will also participate in the Football and Basketball Band. Along with attendance and class assignments, students will be responsible for performances at 3 evening concerts, 4-5 home football games, 5-6 home basketball games, and one parade as part of their grade. Failure to meet these expectations will result in a lower grade. Members must also purchase their performance attire for evening concerts.

Symphonic Band F710

One year/1 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Admission for 9th grade and transfer students by permission of instructor.

Cost: $85 Activity Fee (subject to change, fee waivers available from athletic office)
Marching not required, but strongly recommended

Symphonic Band is a performance class open to qualified instrumentalists with permission from the instructor. The class will stress playing fundamentals, major, minor, and chromatic scales and rudiments of music theory. Home practice is expected and private lessons are encouraged. Members are eligible to participate in the solo/ensemble festival and may audition for All-State and All-Northwest performing groups. Symphonic Band members perform at school concerts and have the option of participating in the Marching Ensemble, which is highly recommended. As part of the band commitment, students will also participate in the Football and Basketball Band. Along with attendance and class assignments, students will be responsible for performances at 3 evening concerts, 4-5 home football games, 5-6 home basketball games, and 2-3 parades as part of their grade. Failure to meet these expectations will result in a lower grade. Members must also purchase their performance attire for evening concerts.

Wind Ensemble F715

One year/1 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Admission by consent of instructor.

Cost: $85 Activity fee (subject to change, fee waivers available from athletic office)
Marching is not required, but is strongly recommended.

Wind Ensemble is a performance class open to the highest level instrumentalists with permission from the instructor. The class will stress rudiments of music theory, ear training, and advanced playing techniques. Some evening and after school rehearsals will be required along with three to four festivals after school or during the school day. Home practice is expected and private lessons are encouraged. Wind Ensemble members are eligible to participate in the solo/ensemble festival and may audition for All-State and All-Northwest performing groups. Members perform at school concerts and have the option of participating in the Marching Ensemble. Along with attendance and class assignments, students will be responsible for performances at three evening concerts, four to five home football games, five to six home basketball games and two to three parades as part of their grade. Failure to meet these expectations will result in a lower grade. Members must also purchase their performance attire for evening concerts and festivals. Wind Ensemble is a highly competitive hard working team of students that relies on each members' commitment to each and every festival and competition. Only the most dedicated musicians will be considered for this class. Wind Ensemble is a year-long committment.

Jazz Ensemble F720

One year/1 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Admission by audition and permission of instructor

Cost: $85 Activity fee, if not enrolled in another ensemble (subject to change, fee waivers available from athletic office).

Open to band members of advanced ability. Emphasis is placed upon the study of jazz materials and techniques with the inclusion of some study of music theory. The Jazz Ensemble will perform at concerts, festivals, civic events and special activities as part of the class work. Along with attendance and class assignments, students will be responsible for performances at three evening concerts as part of their grade. Participation in two to three festival events after school or during the school day is also expected. Members must also purchase their performance attire for evening concerts and festivals.

Instrumental Music StudioF770

One year/1.0 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: consult with music teacher

Learn to play a new instrument or improve your performance skills on the instrument you already play! Learn to read music or improve your knowledge of reading music and music theory. Class time is divided between group rehearsal, individual practice time, and short in class performances. Piano, guitar, ukelele, & limited focus on wind instruments or strings, are all welcome! Some school owned instruments are available for students in need.

AP Music Theory F6541
AP logo

One year/1.0 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: consult with music teacher

AP Music Theory will develop a student's ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic materials and processes of music. The course focuses on music of the Common Practice Period (1600-1900) but will include others as well. Students' musical abilities will be developed through various listening, performance, written, creative, and analytical exercises. Students may sit for the AP Music Theory Exam and if planning to major in music in college might enroll in an advanced music theory course, depending upon the individual college's policy. (Basic knowledge of sheet music notation is strongly recommended.)

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit


Science

The science teachers at Beaverton High School believe that a fundamental and vital function of education is to enhance each student's ability to make responsible decisions about their role in society. Scientific literacy in the disciplines of Physical Science, Earth and Space Science, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics is an important foundation to being a citizen in the 21st century when many local and global issues and careers are based on S.T.E.M., (Science-Technology-Engineering-Math.)

Students attending Beaverton High School have a variety of opportunities, beginning in the Physics/STEM Physics curriculum and continuing through higher-level course offerings, to participate in a rigorous and challenging science program that helps them develop the skills needed to be successful citizens.and foster a life-long interest and appreciation for science learning.

Our college/career pathway will use an articulated learning sequence of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. This core science pathway should be followed, with other science electives taken concurrently or after the completion of the Physics, Chemistry, Biology sequence. Students will enroll at the appropriate level taking into account their aspirations, skills, knowledge, experiences, ACT scores, and mathematical abilities. The goal is to provide them challenge, rigor and the proficiencies to succeed and excel in science.

The freshman, sophomore and junior curricula are organized around a series of real world problems and are designed to prepare students to achieve state content standards. The upper level course offerings include discipline specific courses in Advanced Placement (AP), Health Careers, Science Research, and elective courses. Our existing 9th, 10th, and 11th grade program prepares students well for the state assessments and AP curricula and our focus on scientific inquiry and engineering and design is consistent with the AP/College/Career readiness philosophy.

Currently, three years of science in high school is required for graduation. Students who take the Physics, Chemistry, Biology sequence will meet these requirements. For college preparation it is recommended that students take four years of science.



SCIENCE
College and Career Pathways
Advanced STEM Interest
9th Physics STEM Physics STEM Chemistry
10th Chemistry STEM Chemistry AP Biology
11th Biology AP Biology*
Health Career Students*
AP Science Electives
Health Career Students*
12th

The above core science pathway should be followed, with other science electives taken concurrently or after the completion of the Physics, Chemistry, Biology sequence.

•AP Physics 1 and 2, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP Biology

•Marine Systems, Biotechnology, Science Research, Human Anatomy and Physiology, Health Careers

•Health Careers is a lottery application program that includes – Jr. year – Human Anatomy and Physiology
See Advanced Health Careers for more information.

Graduation Requirements
Three credits of Science are required for graduation.

Physics C611

One year/1 Science credit
Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None

This is a lab-based physics course designed for freshmen. Using the processes of scientific inquiry, engineering design, and critical thinking, students will discover and apply patterns in such major physics topics as motion, forces, energy, waves (and electromagnetism). An important aim of the course is to develop and build students’ math abilities, problem solving skills, scientific literacy, and technical communication that will be useful in later science courses. This course will address all Oregon Department of Education (ODE) physics, inquiry, and engineering standards as well as reinforce good educational behaviors and study skills that will promote academic success.

Physics - Dual Language C611D

One year/1 Science credit
Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None

This course is the same as Physics except that it is taught almost entirely in Spanish.

STEM Physics C612
PCC logo

One year/1 Science credit
Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None

PCC Credit Option: EN100 (1 PCC credit)

This is a lab-based physics course designed for freshmen. Using the processes of scientific inquiry, engineering design, and critical thinking students will discover and apply patterns in such major physics topics as motion, forces and momentum, energy, waves, and electromagnetism. An important aim of the course is to develop and build students' math abilities, performance in problem solving, scientific literacy, and technical communication skills that will be useful in later science courses. This course will address all ODE physics, inquiry, and engineering standards. STEM physics will weave together a deeper conceptual understanding of required topics with more sophisticated mathematical analyses in the form of extension projects and activities.

STEM Physics - Dual Language C612D
PCC logo

One year/1 Science credit
Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None

PCC Credit Option: EN100 (1 PCC credit)

This course is the same as STEM Physics except that it is taught almost entirely in Spanish.

Chemistry C511

One year/1 Science credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Physics or STEM Physics

This year long, lab-based course addresses all of the NGSS standards for chemistry, inquiry and engineering, emphasizing the connections between the laboratory and the world around you. This course will help students to build fundamental science related math skills. This course is intended to provide students with college ready science skills regardless of higher-level educational focus. The course will study the interactions among different forms of energy and matter. Topics addressed will include the structures of atoms and compounds, the Periodic Table, chemical reactions, gases, solutions, chemical quantities, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics. Content and skills from Physics will be built upon. The student will see how chemistry is taking place all around us and will understand the many chemical products s/he uses each day.

Chemistry - Dual Language C511D

One year/1 Science credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Physics or STEM Physics

This course is the same as Chemistry except that it is taught almost entirely in Spanish.

STEM Chemistry C512

One year/1 Science credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Physics or STEM Physics

This year long course will student the interactions among different forms of energy and matter, emphasizing higher level mathematical relationships and reasoning. The mathematical skills necessary for success include algebraic manipulation, graphing and data analysis. This course is intended for students who are interested in exploring Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) career or educational pathways. It will address, with extended depth, the NGSS standards. Topics addressed will include the structures of atoms and compounds, the Periodic Table, chemical reactions, gases, solutions, chemical quantities, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics.

STEM Chemistry - Dual Language C512D

One year/1 Science credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Physics or STEM Physics

This course is the same as STEM Chemistry except that it is taught almost entirely in Spanish.

AP Chemistry C590
AP logo

One year/1 Science credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: STEM Chemistry or consent of instructor.

This course has summer reading/assignment requirements. Please visit or email the instructor in June. This course is for students who wish to complete one year of college chemistry and take the AP Chemistry exam. This is a rigorous, college-level course with high expectations. The curriculum covers content in the areas of matter and energy, atomic theory, periodic table, bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the gas laws, acids and bases, equilibrium and oxidation-reduction.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

Biology C411

One year/1 Science credit
Grade: 11

Prerequisite: Chemistry or STEM Chemistry

In this laboratory-based course, students will have the opportunity to better understand their relationship with other living things. Students will explore the fundamental characteristics of living matter and the unifying principles of life. Students will study and learn about the diversity of all living things, biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, ecology and environmental issues and evolution. This course is designed to meet Oregon State Science Standards.

AP Biology C490
AP logo

One year/1 Science credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: STEM Chemistry, consent of current instructor

This is a laboratory-based course that follows the curriculum similar to that of a first year college level biology course. Topics include ecology, animal anatomy and physiology, plant biology, evolution, cell biology, biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology. This course is for students who wish to get biology college level credit by taking the AP exam in the spring. College level credit is often granted to students who pass the AP exam and these students are able to register for courses where biology is a prerequisite.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

Biotechnology C855

One semester/0.5 Science credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Physics or Chemisty

In this laboratory-based class, students will explore the field of biotechnology research. Students will learn advanced cell biology and genetics. Students will learn about the development of the field of biotechnology by doing techniques ranging from gel electrophoresis, sequencing, and gene amplification/PCR. We will explore current advances in the field and discuss relevant bioethical issues.

Human Anatomy & Physiology C425
PCC logo

One year/1 Science credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Physics, Chemistry

PCC credit options: Biology 121/122

This year-long class specializes in the study of the human body. Exercises include the identification of the body systems (skin, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, digestive and respiratory) as well as investigations in how those systems function. Lecture/discussions are complemented by labs involving microscopic studies, hands-on discovery and some dissections. This class is for any junior or senior interested in the science of the human body; it also fulfills the science prerequisite to be accepted into Advanced Health Careers.

Marine Systems C460

One Semester/0.5 Science Credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Physics, Chemistry, $10 lab fee

Marine Systems is designed for students interested in ocean life and the marine environment. Students will explore sciences such as geology and oceanography that shape the marine environment as well as investigate the diversity of sea life and the different marine ecosystems. Current issues concerning the ocean--laws, management, and conservation will be included.

AP Physics 1 C6931
AP logo

One year/1 Science credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: STEM Physics or STEM Chemistry.

NOTE: AP Physics 1 and 2 can be taken in ANY order.

AP Physics is an algebra-based college- level course that explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific thinking and reasoning skills.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

AP Physics 2 C6941
AP logo

One year/1 Science credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: STEM Physics or STEM Chemistry.

NOTE: AP Physics 1 and 2 can be taken in ANY order.

AP Physics 2 is an algebra-based, college- level physics course that explores topics such as fluid statics and dynamics; thermodrynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields;electromagetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

AP Environmental Science C790
AP logo

One year/1 Science credit
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Chemistry

AP Environmental Science is a one year advanced science course that studies the environment viewed through an interdisciplinary lens. Students will use scientific principles to analyze a variety of environmental issues and examine possible solutions. In this examination, students will explore the political, social, and moral implications of human activities with respect to the environment. Topics range from human population growth to global warming. This course is open to all students who are interested in learning more about the natural world. Skills and concepts can be applied to careers that involve natural resources, ecotourism, environmental law, wildlife management and related fields.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

AP logo

 

AP courses prepare students to take AP exams in the spring. College credit may be available.

PCC logo

 

PCC logo indicates PCC Dual Credit course. Free Portland Community College credit available.

Social Studies

Graduation requirements
Three years (3.0 credits) of Social Studies is required for graduation.

The social studies department at Beaverton High School believes that the content of social studies courses can be used to develop the skills that students need for career and college readiness. Skills such as critical thinking, communication and research are included in every course. While three years of social studies are required for graduation, those students seeking college admission are advised to complete four years of social studies, including one or more AP courses. After completing the required 9th and 10th grade courses, Beaverton students are able to pick from a wealth of courses to compete the third required year. Options include full year or semester courses, including five Advanced Placement (AP) courses.

REQUIRED COURSES

Social Studies 9 S225

One year/1 SS credit
Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None

All 9th grade students will be enrolled in this course. They will receive a year's credit (1.0) in Social Studies. The course work integrates social science skills around three themes in the 20th Century: Role of Government, Imperialism and International Relations. There will be an emphasis on skill building, research, and problem solving.

Honors Designation transcript credit will be granted to 9th and 10th grade students who complete the “Honors” course of study. The course of study will consist of in-depth readings, and independent research projects.

Social Studies 10 S230

One year/1 SS credit
Grade: 10
Prerequisite: None

All 10th grade students will be enrolled in this course. They will receive a year's credit (1.0) in Social Studies. The course will emphasize written and oral communication skills, critical thinking, research skills, and acquiring content knowledge in U.S. history and economics. The course of study is based on the themes of Economic Change, Reform, and the Age of Disillusionment.

Honors Designation transcript credit will be granted to 9th and 10th grade students who complete the “Honors” course of study. The course of study will consist of in-depth readings, and independent research projects.

Any student who does not receive credit in one or both semesters of 9th grade Social Studies will need to take equivalent credits later in order to meet the 3.0 SS credit graduation requirement. The student will enroll in 10th Grade Social Studies as a sophomore, and can make up the credits for 9th Grade at any time. Any student who fails one or both semesters of 10th Grade Social Studies will need to retake 10th Grade Social Studies.

When students have completed the 3 credits of social studies required for graduation, additional SS courses may be taken for elective credit. Each course may be taken only once for Social Studies credit.

Note: Social Anthropology and AP Psychology do not count as Social Studies credit.

SEMESTER ELECTIVES

Economics S605X

One semester/0.5 SS credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Students will apply and develop basic Microeconomics and Macroeconomics concepts to local and global issues in Economics. Topics will include: market types, the stock market, consumerism, Federal Reserve, International Monetary Fund, world trade, and economic development in developing countries. Skill development will range from real-world budgeting to analyzing and creating solutions for current economic problems.

History In Film S485X

One semester/0.5 SS credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

In this course, students will view historical films with the goal of critiquing and assessing each film in question. This may include how various themes and/or issues are treated throughout time and how they are impacted by historical events. The West, War and Conflict, and Cultures are examples of possible themes. Students will view eight to ten films during the semester, including both US and World History. Written assignments will be of short and medium length. Small and large group discussion will be held before and after each film. The curriculum for this course may include R-rated movies and parents will be asked to sign a permission form.

Criminal Law S531X

One semester/0.5 SS credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

This semester course is a study of the American legal system as it relates to crime and law enforcement. The course will include a study of the US constitution, the rights of the accused, and our system of punishment. Activities will include Supreme Court simulations and mock trials. Students will gain experience in public speaking, forming legal arguments and persuasive writing. Students who have completed “Law” at BHS may not enroll in Criminal Law.

Civil Law S536X

One semester/0.5 SS credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

This semester course is a study of the American legal system as it relates to civil law. The course will include a study of the US constitution, civil rights, torts and the jury process. Activities will include Supreme Court simulations and mock trials. Students will gain experience in public speaking, forming legal arguments and persuasive writing. Students who have completed “Law” at BHS may enroll in Civil Law.

FULL YEAR ELECTIVES

World History S440

One year/1 SS credit
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

World History examines major trends in history and culture using a global perspective. Contemporary issues are included to show relationships between the past and present. Students will learn to analyze, evaluate and interpret historical events and trends. The development of research and writing skills is a key component of the course.

AP Economics S620
AP logo

One year/1.0 SS credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

The AP Economics course prepares students for the AP exams in Microeconomics and Macroeconomics. The microeconomics component of the course gives students an understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system.

The macroeconomics component of the course is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. It also develops students' familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

AP Human Geography S340
AP logo

One year/1 SS credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

Advanced Placement Human Geography is a college level survey course of the discipline. Students will be introduced to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth's surface. Students will examine and analyze human social organization and its environmental consequences. Units of study include Population, Cultural Patterns and Processes, Political Organization of Space, Agriculture, Economic Development, and Urban Land Use.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

AP United States History S410
AP logo

One year/1 SS credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

This course is a survey of the history of the United States, with particular emphasis on political, economic, and foreign policy aspects of history from 1492 to the present. AP U.S. History is designed as the equivalent of a college-level course; strong reading and writing skills are essential. A major goal of the course is to develop the skills students will need to succeed in college courses.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

AP Government S515
AP logo

One year/1 SS credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

this course prepares students to sit for two AP exams, the United States Goverment exam and the Comparative Government and Politics exam. The US government portion of the course introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The Comparative government portion of the course introduces students to the rich diversity of political life outside the United States.The course uses a comparative approach to examine the political structures; policies; and the political, economic, and social challenges among six selected countries: Great Britain, Mexico, Russia, Iran, China, and Nigeria. Additionally, students examine how different governments solve similar problems by comparing the effectiveness of approaches to many global issues.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

ELECTIVE COURSES--NO SOCIAL STUDIES CREDIT

Social Anthropology S730

One year/1 elective credit
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

In this course, students will study several societies and cultures, comparing such variables as family structure, socialization, ritual, migration, religious beliefs, and education. Students use their own experiences and knowledge of their own culture as a basis for comparison. Students will read three ethnographic studies and conduct their own anthropological observations. Strong reading and writing skills are essential.

AP Psychology S725
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One year/1 elective credit
Grades: 11,12

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

Advanced Placement Psychology is a college level survey course of the discipline. The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students will be exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. It includes physiological psychology, child and adolescent development, abnormal psychology, perception, elements of social psychology, and other psychological topics.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

The Global Community Pathway has been discontinued effective the 2016-2017 academic year. Students interested in a social studies capstone experience should consider taking the Global Seminar course for an opportunity to examine and discuss current global issues.

Graduation requirements
Some courses meet specific graduation requirements; others may award elective credit. See your case coordinator for specific information.

Student Support

Beaverton High School is committed to promoting life-long learning in all students. By providing small classroom size and tailored instruction, the Student Support Program addresses the specific needs of students who have met the requirements under Federal Law IDEA for an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Classes offered in the Student Support Program are in the areas of Language Arts and Composition, Mathematics, Communications, Study Skills, and Self-Enhancement.

Placement Requirements: Recommendation by teacher, counselor, or parent along with:

  1. A referral for testing or current IEP
  2. Team decision for placement
  3. Case coordinator's approval

Academic Seminar R415

One year/1 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

This course will provide organizational support along with content strengthening in the core areas of social studies, science, English and mathematics through lecture review, practice of learning strategies and tutorial time.

Communications I R205

One Year/1 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

This course is designed to support students in receptive and expressive language skills. Focus is on expanding vocabulary and imporving inpersonal communication skills.

Communications II R210

One Year/1 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

This course is designed to support students in receptive and expressive language skills. Focus is on developing/expanding vocabulary knowledge and concepts, understanding abstract concepts of figurative language, identifying main ideas/supporting details and improving pragmatic communication skills.

Learning Strategies I/II/III/IV R405,R410,R411,R412

One year/1.0 Elective credit
Grades: 9,10,11,12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

Students will receive Specially Designed Instruction aligned to their IEP goals. Additionally, case coordinators will provide support for developing organizational skills and learning strategies that will benefit students in all of their courses.

Work Experience I-IV R650, R655, R660, R665

One year/1 Elective credit each (students advance to each level)
Grades: 9,10,11,12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

The work experience program assists students in entering the world of work. Students begin acquiring competitive work skills while working at "in building" placements at BHS. Most students follow a natural progression from their “in building” BHS placement, to a monitored job slot in the community; some students advance to hold an employer paid position. Students complete an interest inventory, participate in job shadowing, and receive one on one job coaching. These pre-employment training opportunities help students to develop the skills necessary to find and keep future employment and explore career interests.

Life Choices (EGC) R605

One year/1 Elective credit
Grades: 9,10,11,12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

Life Choices is a course that focuses on positive decision-making. Anger management and communication techniques are explored.

ACADEMIC LEARNING CENTER (ALC)

The ALC program provides specifically designed instruction for students whose Individual Education Program reflects a need for instruction in academic areas through the modification of grade-level curriculum and instruction. This program provides instruction in reading, writing, science, social studies, life skills, and social skills. ALC students also participate in elective classes in the regular education setting.

Math Fundamentals I-IV R307-309 & R312

One year/1 Elective credit ea.
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

These courses are designed for students whose IEP's reflect a need for basic calculation, money skills, time, measurement, analyzing graphs, and other functional math skills.

Literacy Foundations I-IV R246-R249

One year/1 Elective credit ea.
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

These courses are designed for students whose IEP's reflect a need for decoding skills, word building, word meanings, and comprehension skills. Using a variety of texts, students will have the opportunity to read and write in real life situations.

Life Skills I-IV R506-R509

One year/2 EL credits each/2 periods
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

These courses are designed for students whose IEP's reflect a need for independent living skills training, community awareness and social skills training.

Science Foundations I-IV R351-354

One year/1 Elective credit each
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

These courses are designed for students in a specialized program. The focus will be on how science applies to our lives and the world around us.

History Basics I & II R550, R551

One semester/0.5 Elective credit ea.
Grades: 9,10,11,12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

These classes are designed for students in a specialized program. They will expose students to important events and people in World History.

Government Basics I & II R560, R561

One semester/.5 Elective credit ea.
Grades: 9,10,11,12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

These classes are designed for students in a specialized program. Study includes the composition and function of local, state, and national governments in the United States and in other countries throughout the world, as well as rights and responsibilities of citizenship.

 

Health Basics I & II R510, R511

One semester/0.5 Elective credit ea.
Grades: 9,10,11,12

Prerequisite: IEP and case coordinator approval

These classes are designed for students in a specialized program. They provide knowledge for life-long health and well-being.

INDEPENDENT SKILLS CENTER (ISC)

The ISC program is designed to meet the needs of students who have intellectual disabilities and/or other disabilities. Students are identified for this program by formal testing and observation by a Multidisciplinary Team. An Individual Education Plan is developed with each student and his/her family. This program provides instruction in basic life skills, communication, literacy, social skills and transition skills. Instruction is environmentally integrated and meaning- based. ISC students graduate from BHS at age 21 with an alternative certificate.

Adaptive Physical Ed P300

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Community Living R725

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Household Skills R735

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Literacy R705

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Communication R710

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Leisure Skills R740

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Math R715

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Social Skills R720

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Work ExperienceR760

Grades: 10, 11, 12

STRUCTURED ROUTINES CENTER (SRC)

The SRC is a specialized program that provides services to students whose Individualized Education Plan (IEP) demonstrates a need for communication, socialization, life skills and academic instruction, as well as provision of sensory supports. Students in this program exhibit the ability to learn routines quickly and follow them with minimal support. Students are placed in this program by the Beaverton School District's Program Review Team.

Adaptive Physical Ed P300

One Year/1 PE credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

This class provides an opportunity for SRC students to interact in a P.E. class.

Community Skills R725S

One Year
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Areas of instruction include money handling skills, shopping, eating out, appropriate community behaviors, safety, use of public transportation, as well as trips to the library, post office, and community center. The focus of the class will be on developing social skills in a public setting.

Household Skills R735S

One Year
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Areas of instruction include cooking, cleaning, laundry, and simple home maintenance.

Literacy R705S

One Year
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Areas of instruction include: reading and comprehension, writing, functional vocabulary, and reading for information.

Leisure Skills R740S

One Year
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Areas covered include interpersonal relationships, personal safety, arts and crafts, and community recreation,

Math R715S

One Year
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Students use real life situations and manipulatives to understand functional concepts such as time, numbers, money, schedules, story problems, fractions, and budgets.

Social Skills R720S

One Year
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Areas covered include manners, interpersonal relationships, personal safety, and conversation topics.

Work Experience I WEX1

One Year
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: IEP team recommendation, nonstandard diploma

This course is designed to assist students in learning basic work skills through both direct instruction and real life hands on experiences. Students will work toward work experience learning targets with a focus on gaining independence. WEX 1 focuses on a variety of in-building job tasks.

Work Experience II WEX2

One Year
Grade: 12

Prerequisite: IEP team recommendation, nonstandard diploma and transition specialist recommendation

This course is designed for students who have met a level of independence on WEX learning targets and have demonstrated readiness for community inclusion. This course will give students an opportunity to learn work skills in a community setting. Students will complete a structured work experience with community partners working on learning targets in a community setting. Travel training is offered when appropriate.

Visual Arts

Fees are used to purchase the bulk of supplies and equipment used in the art studio, such as canvas, printing inks, art papers, and ceramic tools and glazes. Students need to provide pencils and erasers.

Art 1 F211

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Fee: $20

Get started having fun with art. Learn to express your creative side using the elements and principals of art . Learn about patterns, texture, value, balance, composition and more in a way that encourages experimentation and self-expression. From there, you decide how to proceed and create three significant pieces with a choice of themes. Whether you are a first time art student or an experienced art student craving the opportunity to make something great …this is the class for you. The course may also be the start of more fun with art in the future because it prepares you for other courses such as Drawing 1, Painting 1, Printing Making 1 and Computer Graphics.

Drawing 1 F221

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Art 1
Fee: $20

Love to draw? Do you want to try your hand at learning something new? This class will teach you to draw what you see, to sketch what you are imagining, and to relax by drawing. Drawing 1 will introduce a variety of drawing techniques and drawing materials including, but not limited to, graphite, charcoal, oil pastel, chalk pastel, Sharpie, crow quill pen & ink and Copic markers. You will learn different styles of drawing so that you can develop your own style. If you are interested in expressing yourself visually, this class is for you.

Painting 1 F231

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Art 1
Fee: $20

This introductory painting class will include instruction in both traditional and contemporary painting techniques and mediums. Students will explore a variety of subject matter using tempera, watercolor, gouache, acrylic paints, oil pastels, and oil paints on multiple surface types. This course encourages students to explore painting as a form of visual communication and self-expression.

Printmaking F243

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Art 1
Fee: $20

Printmaking introduces students to a variety of printmaking techniques using processes such as relief printing, monoprints and block prinintg; intaglio (etching and engraving); and perigraphy (silkscreen films, stencils, block-out). These courses emphasize design elements and principles and introduce art criticism as applied to fine art prints. Lessons may also include the historical development of printmaking in Western and non-Western cultures.

Advanced Art F360

One year/1.0 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Art 1 and consent of instructor

Fee: $20 per semester

This is a two semester class that provides advanced study in the fine arts- painting, drawing, mixed media and printmaking. Emphasis is on content as well as technical development. Students study ethnically diverse historical and contemporary art. Students who plan to attend art school or continue their studies of the arts in college have the opportunity to develop a portfolio.

Ceramics 1 F321

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Fee: $20

Students will learn basic handbuilding techniques to create both functional and non-functional works. The basics of wheel thrown ceramics, including glazing and firing methods, will be taught. Historical and cultural aspects of three-dimensional art will be integrated in the curriculum. Critical analysis (both spoken and written) of three dimensional works, as well as students' own works, is required.

Ceramics 2 F322

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: B or higher in Ceramics 1

Fee: $20

The Ceramics 2 course provides an advanced studio experience for the student who desires a continuation in the media. Students participate in the entire process including the design, construction, decoration, and firing of assigned projects. The Ceramics 2 class covers the construction of complex forms including fitted lids and components, the construction of modular projects, sculptural ceramics, and larger forms. Areas of focus include Pottery of the Southwest, Japanese and Chinese ceramics, and contemporary ceramics.

Ceramics Studio F350

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: A in Ceramics 2 or teacher approval

Fee: $20

Ceramics Studio provides the opportunity for students who have excelled in Ceramics 2 to further explore the media. The course requires a proposal outlining focus of study and projects to be completed during the semester. The curriculum for the course will be developed on an individual basis in collaboration between the teacher and student. Monthly presentations and an exhibition of the portfolio of work generated during the course are required.

Sculpture F340

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Fee: $20

The sculpture class is an introduction to 3-dimensional sculpture made from clay, wood, stone, plaster and paper. Students will explore history, aesthetics, art criticism and production. Sculpture projects will emphasize the required knowledge and skills in the media as well as the exploration of conceptually driven projects.

Digital Photography 1F410

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Fee: $20

In this course students will have an opportunity to develop knowledge and skills necessary to explore the art-related concepts of good photographic composition. In addition, students will practice computerized image manipulation in the digital darkroom using modern software systems.

Digital Photography 2F420

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Digital Photography 1
Fee: $20

This class will provide advanced level education in digital techniques, including Adobe software, and the development of expertise in the elements and principles of design as they relate to the art of photography. Lighting techniques are taught in detail including studio electronic flash lighting and continuous lighting. The working methods of the professional photographer are explored in the production of a portfolio of black-and-white and color images for commercial or fine art applications. Students will leave this class with an extensive digital portfolio.

AP Studio, (Drawing, 2D or 3D, Photography) Art F385
AP logo

One year/1.0 AA credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Advanced Art and consent of instructor

Fee: $25 per semester

Advanced Placement Art is a national program designed to serve students who wish to pursue college-level studies while still in high school. Students taking AP Studio Art will develop an extensive portfolio in Drawing, 2D Design, or Photography which will be submitted to the College Board in May. The 2017-18 portfolio review cost will be approximately $89. Students who score well may receive college credit and appropriate college placement from participating colleges. This college-level art class allows highly motivated students the opportunity to develop a body of related works based on individual interests reflecting an investigation of a specific concept or subject. The goal is to demonstrate a wide array of skills using a diverse variety of media. This course requires substantial time and effort outside of class to complete the portfolio. Course may be repeated for credit.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit

History of Motion Pictures A270

One semester/0.5 AA credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

This course examines the history and evolution of motion pictures as an art form by viewing films from the silent to the modern era, class discussion, lecture and writing. We will examine changes in filming techniques, technology & innovative filmmakers in a variety of genres.

Graduation Requirements
Three years of Applied Arts are required for graduation. AA credits can be earned in multiple departments.

World Languages

Learning to use a second language effectively in real life situations and developing an understanding and appreciation for other cultures are focuses for all world language classes. World language students build proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in a second language as they become acquainted with the cultures where the language is spoken. At least two years of the same language is required to meet college admission requirements in most universities, including Oregon's public four-year colleges and universities. AP classes are available in Spanish, French and Japanese for students who completed fourth year courses and beyond. French students who enroll in the Challenge Program may receive up to 12 units of college credit at Portland State University.

FIRST-YEAR COURSES

Spanish I W201

French I W301

Japanese I W501

One year/1 Applied Arts Credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Students in first-year language courses will develop the skills needed to communicate at a basic level in their second language. Students build reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills through role-plays, individual and small group practice, and activities based on cds and videos. Students learn about the culture of countries where the language is spoken through films, readings, guest speakers, and a variety of authentic materials.

SECOND-YEAR COURSES

Spanish II W202

French II W302

Japanese II W502

One year/ 1 Applied Arts Credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: 1st Year, C or better, Consent of instructor

Second-year language students continue to build their speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills in their second language. Students increase proficiency through role-plays, individual and small group practice, and activities based on cds and videos. Students learn about other cultures through films, readings, guest speakers, and a variety of authentic materials. Note that most colleges require two years or more of second language study for admission and some require students to demonstrate a certain level of proficiency in the language. Successful completion of the course will prepare students for the rigorous expectations and rewarding experiences of subsequent course work in the second language.

THIRD-YEAR COURSES

Spanish III W203

French III W303

Japanese III W503

One year/1 Applied Arts credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: 2 years of language or consent of instructor

Third-year language students build on skills covered in the first two years. The course helps students converse in the second language about topics from their own lives, handle simple real life situations, understand greater detail in the spoken language, write guided compositions, read and comprehend poetry, short stories, and short articles. Students learn about culture through readings, films, discussion, and guest speakers. Classes are conducted primarily in the second language.

FOURTH-YEAR COURSES

Spanish IV W204

French IV W304

Japanese IV W504

One year/1 Applied Arts credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: 3 years of language or Consent of instructor

Students in fourth-year courses continue to develop their ability to converse in the language and to handle more complex real life situations. They increase their listening skills through a variety of media and classroom activities and read more complex excerpts from articles, literary works, and other authentic texts. Students continue to develop composition skills through guided compositions and peer editing. Students learn about culture through readings, films, discussions, guest speakers, and relevant web sites. Fourth-year courses are conducted in the language being studied, and students are expected to communicate in that language.

AP French Language W306
AP logo

One Year/ 1 AA credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: 3 years French, including French III or equivalent. Consent of instructor.

This is a college-level course designed for students who want to excel in the French language. This course will strengthen oral and written communications and sharpen awareness of the diversity of people and places where French is spoken. Exploration of Francophone literature, history, current events and culture is also central to this class. Students will prepare for the AP examination, although taking the exam is not mandatory. Students who enroll in the PSU Challenge Program through taking this course may receive up to 12 units of college credit at Portland State University.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit. If a student intends to take the AP Exam, they will need to see their world language teacher for the summer assignment requirement(s).

 

AP Japanese W506
AP logo

One Year/ 1 AA credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: 3 years Japanese, including Japanese III or equivalent. Consent of instructor

This advanced course is designed for students who wish to continue Japanese after high school or who want to prepare for the Advanced Placement Examination. Emphasis will be placed on the spoken language, the development of composition skills, and on the comprehension of Japanese written materials. Students will prepare for the AP examination, although taking the exam is not mandatory.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit. If a student intends to take the AP exam, they will need to see their world language teacher for the summer assignment requirement(s).

AP Spanish Language W206
AP logo

One year/1 AA credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: 4 years Spanish including Spanish IV or equivalent Consent of instructor

This is a college-level course for students wanting to excel in Spanish. Discussions in Spanish revolve around current events, culture, and history of Spanish-speaking countries as well as aspects of students' own lives. Students write in detail and focus on reading literary works, articles, and many other authentic texts. Students prepare for the Advanced Placement Examinations. The examinations are not mandatory.

Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May, which may grant college credit. If a student intends to take the AP exam, they will need to see their world language teacher for the summer assignment requirement(s).

Spanish Literature & Composition I W230

One year/1 AA credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Placement Test, Consent of Instructor

This course is designed for native speaking students. Students will learn basic writing conventions. They will also focus on reading comprehension, expanding/enriching vocabulary necessary to communicate in different disciplines such as science, art, literature, business, etc. In this course students will learn the importance of formal register and how to speak Spanish in a professional setting. Students will develop an appreciation for the regionalisms that exist in a language that is spoken in many countries of the world. The students will also need to differentiate between the Social Spanish vs. Academic Spanish.

Spanish Lit. & Comp. II W231

One year/ 1 Applied Arts credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Placement Test, or Heritage Speaker Class I, Consent of Instructor

This course is designed for native speaking students who have completed Heritage Speaker I Class or have placed into Heritage Speaker Class II. Students will further develop their academic reading, writing and formal verbal skills. In this course students will learn the importance of formal register and how to speak Spanish in a professional setting. Students will continue to focus on reading comprehension and expanding/ enriching their vocabulary. Students will have the opportunity to express themselves by writing in different forms: expository, persuasive, narrative descriptive personal and business letters. The students will continue to develop their vocabulary by reading, analyzing and discussing a variety of literary forms and genres-poetry, novel, short story, essay, fable and theater. In class, students will have current speeches and debates with higher output expectations.

Spanish Lit. & Comp. IIIW232

One year/ 1 Applied Arts credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Placement Test, or Heritage Speaker Class II, Consent of Instructor

This course is designed for native speaking students who have completed Heritage Speaker II Class or have scored in the top percent of the Native Speaker Placement Test. In this class the students will read a variety of different literary works and demonstrate their comprehension through literary analysis, thematic based discussions and compositions. This class focuses on the development of formal academic Spanish that is required in upper level courses and beyond the classroom. Students will continue to focus on reading comprehension and expanding/enriching their vocabulary that will prepare them for the Advanced Placement class. This class will refine the student's skills in punctuation, writing conventions and sentence structure. Students will be prepared to deliver short impromptu speeches that will reflect the same expectations as an Advanced Placement student.

Other Courses

Student Leadership E401X

One Semester/0.5 Elective credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

Student Leadership is composed of elected and appointed representatives from the student body as determined by the Associated Student Body (ASB) Constitution. This course is required for all elected student body and class officers, appointed representatives to the school board, site council, and appointed offices of diversity awareness and historian. Regular class time is devoted to student and school issues, community service, school activities, and the development of leadership skills. Members must commit themselves to some evening work as required by Student Leadership responsibilities. The grade is based upon participation in activity committees, community service projects, and leadership training assignments.

Teacher/Office Assistants* E700X

One semester/0.5 Elective credit
Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor

*An approved/signed app must be returned with forecasting form

Assistants serve in positions of trust and responsibility. Their assignments are dependent upon regular attendance and normal progress toward graduation. Assistants work with individual teachers or in the main office, the attendance office, the library, the counseling office, or the Independent Skills Center. Students will receive credit for no more than two (2) semesters and will be graded on a P/F basis.

 

Peer Tutor E300X

One Semester or One Year Elective credit
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Application

Students in the class will tutor and mentor other students throughout BHS. Student tutors will be assigned students to work with as identified through a coordinator. Student tutors will also assist Access Tutorial classes. Must be comfortable approaching new students and knowledgeable of all 9th and 10th core classes.

Elementary School Tutor E301X

One semester/0.5 Elective credit
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Application

Students in this class will be assigned to serve as tutors and teacher assistants at a local elementary school. Nearby schools include Vose, Fir Grove and William Walker. If beyond walking distance, transportation is the responsibility of the student.

Work Experience Tutor E721X

One semester or one year Elective Credit
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: See counselor

Students interested in this class will assist special education students from the ALC, SLC, SCC, and ISC self-contained programs with their work experience activities. Students will primarily work under the direction of the Transition Program Assistants as they help students complete various work experience activities in the building.

Graduation requirements
5.5 elective credits are required for graduation. Elective credit is available in all departments.

District Options

BEAVERTON SCHOOL DISTRICT HIGH SCHOOL OPTIONS PROGRAMS:

WHAT ARE YOUR OPTIONS?

The Beaverton School District is nationally recognized for high student achievement and innovative programs. BSD high school students have the opportunity to investigate learning options that best fit their individual academic needs. Students can choose their neighborhood high school or one of a number of learning options. District transportation is provided to all District learning options. For more information, visit: https://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/depts/tchlrn/opts/ Pages/default.aspx

Neighborhood High Schools - Aloha, Beaverton, Southridge, Sunset and Westview High Schools.

Beaverton School District has five neighborhood high schools that provide challenging, meaningful educational options and extracurricular opportunities for each student. Strong academic offerings include World Languages, International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced Placement (AP) classes and dual credit (DC) options. Students can participate in athletics, drama, band, choir, art, leadership and club activities, as well as community service. College/Career Centers support students in post-high school planning and the student bodies represent the richness of the culture and diversity in our community. Students are automatically enrolled in their neighborhood school. No application is required to attend your neighborhood school. For more information about your neighborhood school, visit: www.beaverton. k12.or.us/home/schools/high-schools/ .

Learning Option High Schools - Common Application Programs

The following interest-based schools require application through the BSD Learning Options Common Application. Applications and information about the application process and timeline are available at: www.beaverton.k12.or.us/home/ schools/option-schools-and-programs/ .

Arts & Communication Magnet Academy (ACMA) - 11375 SW Center Street, Beaverton, OR 97005

ACMA serves students in grades 6-12. Students are attracted to ACMA because they possess a skill, are proficient, or show strong potential in one of the arts. At ACMA students receive a rigorous academic program combined with rich pre-professional experiences in an array of artistic disciplines. The combination of high expectations and an art-focused curriculum produces graduates who are well prepared for post-secondary study in a wide range of pursuits, both within and outside of the arts. For more information, visit www.beaverton.k12.or.us/acma. Contact: ACMA 503.672.3700.

Health & Science School (HS2) - 18640 NW Walker Road, Beaverton, OR 97006

HS2 serves students in grades 6 through 12 and is open to all students with an interest in science, medicine and engineering. HS2 is a powerful learning community in a small school setting for students from all social, cultural and economic backgrounds. As a part of this college prep program, students learn in small, teacher-led investigative teams that foster communication, engagement, research skills, critical thinking, and problem solving. Students are able to earn college credit in grades 9 through 12 and will be prepared to pursue a career in the science, health, or engineering professions. In addition, there are opportunities for health career certification courses for all students. HS2 students may also participate in internship rotations at local hospitals, medical facilities and research labs. Visit www.beaverton. k12.or.us/health_and_sciences/ . Contact: HS2 503.533.1853.

International School of Beaverton (ISB) - 17770 SW Blanton, Beaverton, OR 97006

ISB is an International Baccalaureate World School authorized to offer the IB Middle Years Program (MYP, grades 6-10) and the IB Diploma Program (DP, grades 11-12). The International Baccalaureate Program is a rigorous standardized worldwide curriculum enhanced with World Languages including Chinese, Japanese, or Spanish. At ISB, students experience regular presentations and/or dialogue sessions about international topics presented by international visitors and community members. International perspectives and critical thinking skills are emphasized and promoted throughout the rigorous curriculum. In addition, students are required to engage in individual research, inquiry into the theory and nature of knowledge, and to participate in community service and action projects. The Middle Years Program at ISB prepares students for the Diploma Program, a rigorous pre-university course of studies, leading to examinations, that meets the needs of highly motivated secondary school students. Visit www.beaverton.k12.or.us/isb/ . Contact: ISB 503.259.3800

School of Science and Technology (SST) - Merlo Campus - 1841 SW Merlo Drive, Beaverton OR, 97006

SST is a science magnet school for 9th-12th grade students who enjoy learning and desire an educational focus on science, math and technology. Course offerings include life science, physical and earth sciences, math and computers, as well as a rich variety of language arts and social studies classes. Spanish is the world language offered. Writing, critical-thinking and discussion skills are developed in all classes. High expectations, regular homework and challenging projects help students develop their minds. The small school setting fosters a strong community between teachers and students. SST students enjoy extra activities such as dances, Drama, Mock Trial, Science Fair, Ultimate Frisbee and more. While SST attracts many TAG students, many students without the TAG designation have talents and gifts that enrich SST. Visit https://sites.google.com/a/beaverton.k12.or.us/merlostation/sst . Contact: Merlo Campus 503.259.5575

How to Apply to a Learning Option High School-
Common Application Program

ADDITIONAL HIGH SCHOOL LEARNING OPTIONS

Partial Day Option Programs: The BSD offers three partial day option programs for high school students. The programs are: Automotive Technology, located on the campus of Aloha HS, Health Careers, located at Beaverton HS, and Field Biology/Sustainable Foods, located at Terra Nova Organic Farm. Students register for these classes as part of their regular high school forecasting process. The applications for Automotive Technology, Health Careers, and Field Biology/Sustainable Foods are available at https://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/depts/tchlrn/opts/Pages/High-School-Learning-Options.aspx and in the counseling office at your school. The application should be returned, with your completed high school forecasting form, to your high school by the forecasting deadlines at your school.

Automotive Technology 1

1 Year/3.0 Elective credits
Grades: 11 and 12
Prerequisites: Application and pre-test
College Credits: 8 credits from PCC

Fee: $20 per year lab fee, plus $20 for shop shirt

Automotive Technology 1 is designed for students who intend to pursue training after high school in automotive technology or related fields. The program is based on National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) industry standards. The curriculum includes brakes, electrical, steering, suspension and engine performance. Students are invited to participate in the following competitions: Ford AAA and Skills USA with opportunities to win scholarships and tools. The Auto Tech program models the demands of the industry with 50% hands-on experience and 50% academic content. Students have opportunities to participate in site visits and industry activities including job shadows and summer internships. Classes are held at the Aloha High School Auto Lab. Transportation is provided.

NOTE: Automotive Technology applicants must attend one of the following mandatory testing sessions for their application to be considered for the lottery: Monday, March 16, 2015 at 7:00pm or Tuesday, March 17, 2015 at 7:00pm at Aloha High School Auto classroom. The required application is available in the counseling office at your school and at https://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/depts/tchlrn/opts/Pages/Applications.aspx.

Automotive Technology 2

1 Year/3.0 Elective credits
Grade: 12
Prerequisite: C in Auto Tech 1
College Credits: 8 credits from PCC

Fee: $20 per year lab fee, plus $20 for shop shirt

Students receive advanced theory and hands- on experience in the following NATEF areas of study: electrical, brakes, suspension, steering and engine performance. Students develop leadership skills as well as mechanical skills needed in the automotive industry. Students complete task- based activities demonstrating competency in common diagnostic formats. Course activities include visits to industry sites and college programs, job shadows and summer internships. These activities allow students to become familiar with industry standards that will prepare them for postsecondary training and gainful employment. Students have the opportunity to compete in the Ford AAA and Skills USA contests. Classes are held at the Aloha High School Auto Lab. Transportation is provided. The required application is available in the counseling office at your school and https://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/depts/tchlrn/opts/Pages/Applications.aspx .

Health Careers 1

1 Year/1.0 Elective credit
Grades: 11 and 12

Prerequisites: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, Human Anatomy & Physiology; application required.

Fee: $35 per year for program T-shirt, first aid and professional rescuer CPR/AED certifications, and lab supplies.

PCC credit options: MP 109: Medical Terminology (2 credits) and HE 252: First Aid Basics and Beyond (4 credits)

This full-year introductory course is designed for a student who has an interest in exploring or pursuing a career in health services. Students learn core knowledge and skills common to major health careers. Areas of emphasis are medical terminology, medical ethics, safety in health care, career exploration, self-assessment portfolios and some basic health care skills. Students are involved in community health projects such as elementary school health screenings, blood drives and other related community experience. These students have the opportunity to be involved with Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA), a pre-professional organization of potential health care workers. The Red Cross course, Responding to Emergencies, is part of the curriculum. Students explore and demonstrate basic first aid, first aid in remote settings, professional rescuer CPR for adult, child and infant and educational training in Automated External Defibrillation (AED). Health Careers 1 meets every other day at either Beaverton or Westview High School. Transportation is provided.

Note: Health Careers 1 applicants must attend one of the following mandatory meetings for their application to be considered for the lottery: Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 7:00-8:30pm at Westview HS, or Thursday, April 2, 2015, 7:00-8:30pm at Beaverton HS. The required application is available in the counseling office at your school and at www.beaverton.k12.or.us/home/schools/option-schools-and-programs/hard-copy-applications/

Advanced Health Careers

1 Year/2.0 Elective credits
Grade: 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Health Careers 1 and Human Anatomy & Physiology required.

Fee: Program/Uniform costs are approximately $100/year.

PCC credit options: MP110: Medical Terminology (2 credits)

Advanced Health Careers is designed for senior students who have successfully completed Human Anatomy and Physiology at their home high school and Health Careers 1. First semester curriculum includes mastery of basic patient care skills, introductory pathophysiology of common diseases, patient rights, professional skills and medical terminology. The curriculum also includes guest lecturers from diverse health care fields who explain their career pathways, share their expertise and provide updates on current practices. During second semester, students are placed in the community to explore career options with health care professionals. Among the clinical sites offered to students are: hospital, medical, dental, veterinary medicine, physical and occupational therapy, speech and rehabilitation, fitness, sports medicine and medical social service. Students are encouraged to continue their membership in Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA). Advanced Health Careers provides students with a realistic view of career options. Clinical experiences allow students to collect valuable information facilitating educated decisions regarding their future in college or the work place. Advanced Health Careers meets every day at Beaverton High School. Transportation is provided.

 

Field Biology & Sustainable Foods

1 Year / 1.0 Biology credit & 1.0 Applied Arts credit

Grades: 11 and 12

This lab-based hands-on course covers the foundational principals of modern life through the lens of sustainable agriculture at the Terra Nova Farm. Students will work outside and in the classroom learning field biology techniques as well as modern biology laboratory techniques. All Oregon state standards for Biology, Scientific Inquiry and Engineering Design are integrated into the course. Course content will include the studies of biochemistry, cellular processes, genetics, evolution, sustainability, and ecology. Technological, historical, political, and environmental aspects of biology and sustainability will be addressed. Content learned in physics and chemistry courses is built upon and expanded on in a biological context. Critical thinking, research, communication, and analysis are emphasized. For more information visit: https://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/depts/tchlrn/opts/Pages/Applications.aspx

HIGH SCHOOL REVOLVING APPLICATION PROGRAMS

The following high school programs accept applicants throughout the year, generally at the beginning of a quarter or trimester. For more information, see your high school counselor, contact the school or visit https://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/depts/tchlrn/opts/Pages/High-School-Learning-Options.aspx

Community School - Merlo Campus - 1841 SW Merlo Drive, Beaverton, OR 97006

Community School is a full-day program for students in grades 9-12 who want a more supportive high school experience. Community School provides smaller classes, a caring staff, a school-based health center, a flexible schedule, online courses, a no homework policy and a fully staffed daycare center. It is a small, nurturing school community with close ties between teachers and students. Students build self-confidence that culminates in a senior exhibition. Students in grades 9-10 focus on developing academic and social skills necessary for successful progress toward earning a high school diploma. In grades 11-12, they continue building academic skills, work on credit completion and add an emphasis on community service, career exploration, internships, and Merlo Station College Track. Senior exhibitions are a required part of the curriculum in order to graduate from Community School. Community School also includes the Continuing Education Program for Young Parents (CEYP) and students who qualify can earn college credit through PCC coursework while obtaining a high school diploma. Applications are accepted for possible openings at the beginning of each six-week wheel, and students may earn 7.5 credits per year. See your high school counselor for application information. Contact: Merlo Campus 503.259.5575.

Early College High School (ECHS) - Located at two campuses: Rock Creek and Sylvania

ECHS is a unique opportunity for students to blend high school and college in a personalized and rigorous education program at Portland Community College. ECHS is available at both the Rock Creek and the Sylvania campuses. Students must be willing to make a two-year commitment to the program and attend PCC full-time. Students manage their own schedules and take regular, college courses with other PCC students. ECHS staff provides a system of support and career guidance. Every student takes orientation classes and career development coursework. Eligible students are in the 11th or 12th grade or are 16 years of age. Students may be referred by their high school counselor or teacher. Students may be admitted fall, winter, and spring terms, depending on the availability of open slots. In ECHS, it is possible for students to earn a high school diploma, an Associate's Degree or up to two years of college credit. Students also have the option of pursuing their interest in a Career Technical Pathway that supports their individualized learning plan and be applied to a diploma or GED program. Applications are accepted at the beginning of each college quarter. See your high school counselor for application information. Contact: ECHS at PCC Rock Creek: 503.614.7473. For more information, visit www.pcc.edu/prepare/head-start/beaverton.html .

ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL LEARNING OPTIONS

Continuing Education for Young Parents (CEYP) Merlo Campus - 1841 SW Merlo Drive, Beaverton, OR 97006

CEYP provides a supportive environment for teen mothers and fathers completing their education while meeting the responsibilities of pregnancy and parenthood. In addition to regular coursework, students learn about community organizations and social service agencies that provide personal and family counseling, medical assistance, job counseling and other services. A childcare center is available on site and serves as a laboratory for child development and parenting classes. Volunteers and trained staff provide childcare for the infants and toddlers while students attend classes. For information, or to enroll, see your counselor or contact Rhea Medina at 503.259.5575.

Evening Academy Merlo Campus - 1841 SW Merlo Road, Beaverton, OR 97006

Evening Academy is an individualized credit recovery program for 12th grade students on a graduation plan who need two or fewer additional credits to graduate. Students apply through their home school counselor and attend a minimum of 4 hours per week from 1-8 pm, Monday through Thursday. Students are required to make steady progress toward completion of individualized contracts. To apply contact your counselor.

The application is available at https://sites.google.com/a/beaverton.k12.or.us/merlostation/eveningacademy Contact: Merlo Campus 503.259.5575.

GED--Contact your home high school
GED Preparation is a program designed for students who are at least 16 years of age and at least 6 credits behind in graduation requirements. Students are admitted through an application and interview when openings exist. Contact your school counselor for more information.

PASSAGES - 1841 SW Merlo Road, Beaverton, OR 97006

Passages is a transitional program located on the Merlo Campus for students ages 16-20 who are not currently attending their home high school. Students may transition into another educational setting within a semester. This might include returning to their home high school, entering Community High School, the GED prep program or PCC. On average, students attend Passages for approximately eight weeks. Candidates explore the academic opportunities available to them based on age and level of credits, map out their academic plan, and bolster core skills before re-entering their comprehensive high school or other educational option program. While in the Passages program, students will have the ability to earn up to 1.0 elective credit through a course titled Project Success. This course will focus on math, reading and writing skills, as well as behavior and organizational skills. Students will also be asked to complete an independent project. Both direct and individualized instruction are offered to meet student needs. Students in the program will work with the teacher to complete required course work while improving attendance, academic achievement, and developing a positive commitment to being a motivated and successful learner. For more information visit https://sites.google.com/a/beaverton.k12.or.us/merlostation/ passages Contact: Merlo Campus 503.259.5575

Portland Community College Prep

PCC Rock Creek – 17705 NW Springville Road, Portland, OR 97229

The three PCC Prep programs listed below provide an accessible route to college, increasing access for second language students, GED prep students and students who have not been successful in the traditional high school environment. Three programs support and develop students' reading, writing, math, study habits and personal skills so they can meet the rigor of college-level classes. For more information visit www.pcc.edu/prepare/head-start/prep/ .

  1. Multicultural Academic Program (MAP) serves students who are 16-20 years old, are non-native English speakers and have left high school or are risk of leaving before graduation. MAP students build their English literacy skills and academic habits, preparing them to succeed in college. Students may then transition to PCC's YES! program or PCC's Gateway to College program. To apply, see your counselor or contact: PCC Prep Intake (PCC) 971.722.6213.
  2. YES to College (formerly Youth Empowered to Succeed of YES!) serves 16-20 year old at-risk students who have either dropped out of high school or are on the verge of dropping out. YES to College students attend GED prep classes 2-4 times per week and explore future academic opportunities through career development and college classes held once a week. Students are encouraged to continue their college education and may be able to transition to Gateway to College. After completing their GED program, students may be able to apply to Early College HS. To apply, see your counselor or contact: PCC Prep Intake (PCC) 971.722.6213.
  3. The Gateway to College Program serves 16-20 year old at-risk students who have either dropped out of high school or are on the verge of dropping out. Students simultaneously accumulate high school and college credits, earning a high school diploma while progressing towards an Associate's Degree or Certificate. In the first one to two terms, students are in a learning community, building academic and personal skills that prepare them for college courses with the general student population. In addition to reading, writing and math, students, working together, take a college survival and success class to learn how to take effective notes, study for tests and juggle school, work and family life. To apply, see your counselor or contact: PCC Prep Intake (PCC) 971.722.6213.

Notification of Rights Under FERPA

The Family Education Rights & Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) requires school districts to notify parents that schools maintain official records regarding their child, which include information deemed necessary to the welfare of students and the orderly operation of schools or information required by law and regulation. A student's cumulative record consists of personal and family data including certification of name and date of birth, test data, health status reports, permanent records, attendance records, transcripts of coursework, and data showing progress toward the diploma.

Student records are the property of the school district; however, parents may inspect and review their child's records by making a written request to the school principal for an on-site appointment. Parents may challenge the inclusion in their student's records of any information believed to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student's privacy or other rights. Parents may request modification of the records or enter their own statements of explanation. Concerns about the information included in the student's records are to be addressed in writing to and discussed with the school principal. If the concern cannot be resolved between the parent and the principal, a fair and impartial hearing upon the written request of the aggrieved will be convened to review the matter.

BSD may not release any personally identifiable records or files about an individual student without prior written, signed consent of a parent, legal guardian, or adult student. Exceptions include disclosures without consent to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A legitimate educational interest exists when the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his/her professional responsibilities.

Another exception includes release of education records without consent when requested by officials of another school district in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. The school can release certain directory information without consent by the district for non-commercial use: name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, grade level, school attended, program of study, records or participation in school activities and sports, weight and height of team members, dates of attendance, awards and honors received, and most recent previous school attended. The Act grants parents the right to request in writing to the school principal that any or all directory information not be released without their prior consent. This request must be made by the end of the second week of the start of a school year.

These rights of natural parents are also extended to adoptive parents, legal guardians, separated parents consistent with agreements of custody, and students 18 years of age or older or who are attending a post- secondary institution.

Course Index

AVID
E909 AVID Workshop 9
E910 AVID Workshop 10
E911 AVID Workshop 11
E912 AVID Workshop 12
E312 AVID Tutor

Digital Media
F271 Comp Graphics 1
F272 Comp Graphics 2
F480 Computer Animation
A231 Video Journalism
A235 TV News/Documentary
A431 Web Design

Engineering & Trades
A560 Engineering/Design 1
A561 Engineering/Design 2
A531 Drafting/CADD 1
A532 Drafting/CADD 2
A451 Programming 1
A452 Programming 2

English Language Arts
L605 Lit Comp 9
L610 Lit Comp 10
L605/L610 Lit Comp 9/10
L510 American Lit Comp
L518 Exploration Lit Comp
L533 Non-fiction Lit Comp
L516 Myth Bible Lit Comp
L810 AP English Lang
L820 AP English Lit
L514 English Lit Survey
L301X Speech 1
L302X Speech 2
L410X Creative Writing Wkshp
A207 Newspaper
A206 Yearbook
L206 Reading Workshop
L208 Writing Workshop

English Language Learners
N205 Beg. Eng Lang Dev
N208 Early Int Eng Lang Dev
N210 Int Eng Lang Dev
N215 Early Adv Eng Lang Dev
N220 Adv Eng Lang Dev
L601N Lit Comp 1
L602N Lit Comp 2
C611N Sheltered Physics
S2101N Social Studies I
S225N Sheltered Social Studies 9
H390 Intro to Health Careers

Health Careers
H431 Health Careers 1
C425 Human Anatomy
H440/441 Advanced Health Careers
H442 Nurse Assisting 1

Health and Physical Education
H201X Health 1
H202X Health 2
P430X PE 1
P401X Weight Training
P415 Flex and Strength
P530X Net Games
P505X Team Sports
P420X Fitness

Marketing
A411 Comp Apps
B601 Marketing 1
B602 Marketing 2
B515 Sports and Event Mktg
B560 Marketing Management
B616 Digital Marketing
B620 Marketing Seminar
B725 Personal Finance
B360 Bus & Mrktg Communication

Mathematics
M381 Alg/Geo/Stats 1 or DL
M382 Alg/Geo/Stats 2 or DL
M505 Algebra 2
M510 Advanced Alg 2
M520 Functions, Stats & Trig FST
M600 Pre-Calculus
M775 AP Stats
M750 AP Calc AB
M755 AP Calc BC

Performing Arts
F521 Theatre 1
F522 Theatre 2
F501 Theatre Design
F531 Acting 1
F532 Acting 2
F533 Acting 3
F620 Treble Choir
F622 Bass/Tenor Choir
F630 Concert Choir
F670 Ad Vocal Ensemble
F755 Orchestra
F705 Concert Band
F710 Symphonic Band
F715 Wind Ensemble
F720 Jazz Ensemble
F770 Instrumental Music Studio
F6541 AP Music Theory

Science
C611 Physics or DL
C612 STEM Physics or DL
C511 Chemistry or DL
C512 STEM Chemistry or DL
C590 AP Chem
C411 Biology
C490 AP Bio
C855 Biotech
C425 Human Anatomy
C460 Marine Systems
C6931 AP Physics 1
C6941 AP Physics 2
C790 AP Env Science

Social Studies
S225 SS9
S230 SS10
S605X Economics
S485X Hist Film
S531X Criminal Law
S536X Civil Law
S620 AP Econ
S440 World History
S340 AP Human Geo
S410 AP US Hist
S515 AP Government
S730 Social Anthropology
S725 AP Psychology

Student Support Courses

Visual Arts
F211 Art 1
F221 Drawing 1
F231 Painting 1
F243 Printmaking
F360 Advanced Art
F321 Ceramics 1
F322 Ceramics 2
F350 Ceramics Studio
F340 Sculpture
F410 Digital Photography
F420 Digital Photography 2
F385 AP Studio Art
A270 History of Motion Pictures

World Language
W201 Spanish 1
W301 French 1
W501 Japanese 1
W202 Spanish 2
W302 French 2
W502 Japanese 2
W203 Spanish 3
W303 French 3
W503 Japanese 3
W204 Spanish 4
W304 French 4
W504 Japanese 4
W206 AP Spanish
W306 AP French
W506 AP Japanese
W230 Span Lang Lit I
W231 Span Lang Lit II
W232 Span Lit Comp III

Other Courses
E401X Student Leadership
E700X Teacher/Office Assistants*
E300X Peer Tutor
E301X Elementary Sch Tutor
E721X Work Experience Tutor

BEAVERTON HIGH SCHOOL
13000 SW 2nd Street
Beaverton, OR 97005
503-356-2830 (ph)
503-356-2825 (fax)

www.beaverton.k12.or.us/schools/beaverton/